Why Do Cyclists Wear Rubber Boots?

Winter 2009.

When I’m riding eastbound on the south bank of the Willamette River Path, heading towards the Knickerbocker Bridge,  there’s a funny sign that sticks out of the river just past the railroad underpass. I use that sign as an informal way to track the height of the river. In the summer, you can see a lot of the pole below the yellow sign itself. Even when the river is running pretty high in the winter, you can usually make out at least the top of the sign. Well, we’ve been having rather a lot of rain this June. This Friday morning on the way to work, I rode under the railroad trestle and noticed something new:  my little sign was totally underwater.

And then I noticed that the path was underwater, as well. Here’s how it looked around 9:30 on Friday morning:

blankspace

Water lapping at the South Bank river trail

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Row, Row, Row Your Bike…

Today's flooding looked like this flooding from March 30th, except that the trees have leaves now.

The Chambers underpass on the Fern Ridge Bike Trail was flooded again at 6pm today.  The picture on the left  is actually of the Chambers underpass flooding a few months ago, but it was pouring while I was there today and I didn’t want to get my camera out.  I figure if you’ve seen one Chambers underpass flood, you’ve seen them all.

According to a commenter, the last time the Chambers underpass flooded, the West 11th and Beltline underpasses also flooded.  Bike path flooding tends to leave behind lots of slick mud and debris– such as broken glass and sticks— so be extra careful on your morning commutes.

I didn’t see the flooding until 6pm, so I was unable to report it to the City Maintenance Hotline (682-4800):  they are only open from 8 am to 5 pm.  It would have been nice to give them an early heads-up so that they could have cleared the path for the morning commuters.  Unlike the City’s leaf program website (currently suspended), there are no after-hours options for reporting debris issues.

This is how I may have to start getting to work if this stupid rain doesn't quit.

However, they do have a 24 hour pothole reporting form which I’ve begun using when the hotline is closed to report maintenance and debris (such as glass in the bike right-of-way).  I don’t know if doing this is effective, but if we all start doing it maybe something will change.

Was there flooding on your ride today or recently?  Let us know using our recently-fixed comments form!

National Bike to Work Day Open Post

Today is National Bike to Work Day. To celebrate I’m going to post some of my favorite cycling propaganda, and I encourage you to do the same.

www.YehudaMoon.com

Take the jump to read Jim Wilcox‘s recent Register-Guard editorial and view a few pro-cycling videos that have been making the rounds.  Please feel free to post your own links and pictures in the comments.  I’d love to see some shots from this morning’s breakfast events.

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Bike Music Festival and Group Rides: Post Your Pictures and Video!

Saturday's Bike Parade

On Saturday The Willamette Valley Music Festival returned to the University of Oregon Campus with the Bike Music Festival providing the main stage power and entertainment at the EMU fishbowl.  This was the debut of the UO Bike Program’s new “Biker Bar” power generator and dual Mundo bicycle generators.  The three generators, in conjunction with RockTheBike‘s vertical tandem generator, provided all the power needed to run the main stage.

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In The News: Eugene cyclists circumnavigate a frozen Russian lake, The Bailey Hill Road Safety Plaza, and the Springfield High Cycling Club to ride Lewis and Clark trail

“It was at this point that we learned that in very cold temperatures, liquid fuels such as kerosene and gasoline do not give off enough vapors to be flammable,” Pike said. “I was ready to toss the stove into the endless white and eat frozen bread for dinner.” — Christopher Pike, from the Register-Guard’s “Ice Road Bikers”

Every now and then the local news media publishes a cycling story, and sometimes they publish several.  When this happens WeBikeEugene swoops in with our award-winning (not really) “In The News” wrap-up!

Today’s wrap-up will cover the successful 36 day bicycle circumnavigation of Siberia’s Lake Baikal by two Eugene cyclists (and their three non-Eugene buddies),  the planning and dedication of The Bailey Hill Road Safety Plaza, and the Springfield High School Cycling Club’s planned tour of the Lewis and Clark’s expedition route.

And now, lets take the jump!

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Yarn-bombing

Bike Rack with jaunty sweater. Photo by Mary Archer

Sometimes it’s the small things…

It was about a month ago, at the beginning of April, that a friend and I noticed something unusual as we cycled south on Charnelton Street.

The timing was impeccable, since it was installed just in time to be admired by the wave of pedestrians who hit the streets of downtown Eugene for the First Friday Art Walk. Not only was the bike rack on the corner of Charnelton and Olive wearing an impeccably-tailored sweater, but many of the animal sculptures along the street sported jaunty scarves as well.

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