UO Bike Program Unveils Repair Trike

To celebrate Earth Week, and to continue in their great program growth, the University of Oregon’s Bike Program is unveiling their new “Mobile Repair Trike” today.  The trike is a collaboration of the Center for Appropriate Transportation (CAT), the Student Sustainability Coalition, and the UO Bike Program.

UO Mobile Repair Trike (photo by Alexander Hongo)
UO Mobile Repair Trike (photo by Alexander Hongo)

The three-wheeled bike features a metal box integrated into the handlebars. The lid of the box slides to one side to serve as a worktable. When extended, a pegboard full of tools slides up within the mechanic’s reach. A lower compartment can store three collapsible bike stands. The tricycle itself is made to haul heavy loads while still being comfortable for any rider. Other nice features include an Alfine 8-speed internal hub and Avid Disc Brakes with a lock setting for parking.

Matt Keller, UO Bike Program Lead Mechanic said, “It will allow us to work on a lot of bikes where they are, so we don’t have to move them.”  This will be particularly important, he says, when the UO Bike share system is online. That bike share system has been delayed with contract negotiations but is speculated to open sometime over the next year (hopefully soon…).

The Mobile Repair Trike will also be used for free repair events on campus and in the community, according to Keeler, like the one happening today from 10 AM – 4 PM across from Lillis Business School on 13th Avenue. Students and community members can stop by with their bikes to have a free safety check from Bike Program staff and volunteers. Anyone stopping will also be able to take a look at the new Mobile repair bike up close and learn more about the UO Bike Program. Continue reading “UO Bike Program Unveils Repair Trike”

Velo Posse Recovers Stolen Bike. Thieves Beware

Let me tell you a little story about my stolen bicycle. It’s rare to have good news about a bicycle theft but I’ll tell you from the outset this story ends happily. It all started on a typical night (Thursday January 16th). I had ridden my Surly Long Haul Trucker Xtracycle this day, even though for the past few weeks I’d been riding the new Bike Friday Haul-a-Day.  The brakes were rubbing a bit on the Haul-a-Day and I didn’t need to use the Hooptie to pick up the kids so I rode my classic steed. First a little background on the bike.  I’ve had this bike since I worked at Pedal Express in Berkeley, California. Originally the Xtracycle was on an aluminum cyclocross frame in 2002 but I broke that from all the hard work I put it through (like racing it in the Cycle Messenger World Championships in Seattle in 2003). In 2004 I upgraded to the Surly Long Haul Trucker and the first major trip with it was the day Missy proposed to me at Hawk Camp in the Marin Headlands. Since then I’ve ridden that bike on a trip in the Czech Republic, on our Honeymoon in the Yucatan Peninsula, on our “All Around US” circumnavigation of the country, on countless errands/commute trips, many camping trips and eventually carrying all three of our kids on it. Needless to say it’s a pretty damn important bike.   CMWCSEA2003Xtracycle Cargo Continue reading “Velo Posse Recovers Stolen Bike. Thieves Beware”

South Willamette Street- Time for Action

Today I shared some information with a group that is considering endorsing Option One of the South Willamette Street plan, which is the plan to keep it the way it is. With the long op-ed last week and the signs cropping up on the street saying “Four Lanes for Safety” (a pure untruth) it is time for those who want to see a better street for all to speak up!  Write your council member, attend the City Council meeting next week (Facebook event), write your own letter to the editor and educate your friends and neighbors about Option Three.  City staff are working with EcoNorthwest on an economic impact study and once that is complete the City Council will be making a decision on the matter.  We need to get the information out there that a complete street is a safer street and that we want a vibrant business district where walking and biking (and driving) are better!

Here is what I shared with the group (after giving a brief intro the five E’s of Safe Routes to School):

Alternative Three- Wouldn't that be nice
Alternative Three- Wouldn’t that be nice

Today I am here to talk to you about the E of Engineering and the importance of how we build our transportation system in a way that creates a safe environment for our children. Engineering is the infrastructure piece of how we create safe routes not only to and from our schools but as a whole transportation system for families. Infrastructure dictates behavior and when we build a system that makes it very easy to drive everywhere we get an outcome like the one we find ourselves in today; which is walk and bike rates to school have declined from more than 50% in the 1970’s to down to less than 10% by the 2000’s.  Along with our major decline in students using active transportation to move themselves to and from school we have seen a huge increase in obesity.  We know that our built environment effects how we move around our city and we know we need to make some major changes in our built environment to make active transportation the easier choice for kids and families. We’ve seen it around the world and we’ve seen it right here in Eugene. When you build a better place for families to choose active transportation they make that healthier choice because they like it!

Volunteer to Help the Next Generation of Bikers


Thanks to over a dozen staff and volunteers our three bike fleets are maintained and rolling in our schools, now we need volunteers for our rides! The Bike Safety Education season is rolling and SRTS and the City of Eugene need volunteers to join our community bike rides!  We are reaching more students at more schools than ever.  We have three different sessions in the fall and spring with two to three schools each session.

To teach the hundreds of kids we do every season it takes dozens of volunteers helping us as we take up to 40+ kids out on our community streets each session. The rides are usually on Thursdays and Fridays and happen at various times. See the VolunteerSpot Calendar to see the dates and times and to sign up! These rides are a lot of fun for the kids and the volunteers and are a key component to our ten hour bike drivers-ed style course. Thanks for helping!

VOLUNTEER

 

Welcome Back Rides for Students

LiveMove LogoThousands of students are returning to town for the start of the University of Oregon school year. The student transportation and livability group LiveMove is sponsoring a “Bike Orientation” tour of Eugene for all the newbies in town. They’ll share the best ways to get around to different neighborhoods from campus, how to prepare for Oregon rain on a bike, the best bike routes to take, and some often unknown recreation paths! The rides will last about an hour, and if you don’t have a bike, the UO Bike Program will rent you one at a discounted rate!

The tours will be Tuesday October 8th and 15th at 3:30 PM, and Thursday, October 10th and 17th at 5:00 PM. Each ride can accommodate up to 10 riders. If interested, email Nick Meltzer to sign up! More details will follow once sign up has been completed.

Welcome to Eugene students and good luck with the first week of class!

 

Volunteer for Bike Safety Education Fleet Maintenance

It’s back to school time and the Eugene-Springfield Safe Routes to School Program is gearing up by getting our bike safety education fleets in good working order for the year. This year we’ll be teaching hundreds of students our 10-hour “bike drivers-ed” class and our fleets get a lot of use and abuse. We depend on volunteers and the support of the local bike industry to keep these bikes on the road and under kids bottoms.

Come volunteer this Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 pm at the UO Outdoor Program Barn (1225 E. 18 Ave.). We’ll have work for all skill levels. We’ll also have pizza. Drop us an email if you can to help us figure logistics or just show up and lend a hand!

VOLUNTEER

How To Tow a Bike With Your Xtracycle (or similar longtail)

They are slack here.  They only tighten when turning.
Towing a bike? WHAT?!? (straps are optional)

Many of us Xtracycle riders have towed other bikes using the “bag and drag” method (the front wheel of the rear bike simply strapped in a freeloader bag), but I’m sick of that.  I loan bikes out often enough that I want a more elegant solution, so I came up with my own take on the “front hub/fork” method.  I figured I’d post it here in case some of you would like to try it.  The uses include loaning bikes out, bike polo / mtb biking, kids bikes,  and getting your tired riding partners home if they bonk (or are too drunk to ride).

Supplies (about $15-16, I bought mine at the True Value right by Arriving by Bike):

  • 1 old quick release front hub (not figured into the cost)
  • Slotted Angle Iron (about 5 bucks) that you cut to about the width of the rear free-radical bar
  • 4 U-Bolts (about $1.50 each) – two that fit the V-racks and two that fit the hub.
  • 3 hose clamps (I always have these around for bike stuff, about $1.50 each)
  • Grease, hacksaw, fixed wrench, screw driver

This only took about an hour to do.  I hope the pictures are self-explanatory.  Two hose clamps hold the hub back against the angle iron and the third holds the angle iron down on the cross bar.  Two of the U-bolts attach the angle iron to the V-rack holders (the main strength) and the other two attached the hub down on the angle iron.  You may have to modify this a bit if you have the new bag attachment system with the nubs on the V-rack holders instead of straps.

I recommend using the stabilizer straps to the handle bars that I have shown in the picture.  The tow bike tends to want to fall down when you turn sharply without them (but they probably are optional).  With them, the rear wheel of the tow bike lifts rather than having the tow bike fall.  Keep them mostly slack when attaching them, as tightening them only flexes your frame (in a scary way) and lifts the back wheel of the tow bike up.  They’ll tighten on their own as you turn sharply.

Have Fun, click on any picture for a slideshow.  I’m open to suggestions as well!

 

 

 

Webinar Wednesday at Noon: What Bikeways Go Where?

Cycle Track?  Sharrows?  Bike Boulevard?  Bike Lane?

Come learn about how to know what type of bikeway is best for a particular situation. These Webinars are free and open to all.

NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide Webinar Series
Bikeway Design in Context: Determining the right facility for the right street
Wednesday, June 5 | 12:00 to 1:15 p.m.
City of Eugene Engineering Wells Fargo 4th Floor Lyle Conference Room
99 E. Broadway at Broadway and Oak

Bikeway Design in Context: As bikeway design options have multiplied and evolved, the decision-making process for practitioners has become increasingly complex. What kinds of streets are best suited to cycle tracks? When should an engineer use a buffered bike lane rather than a conventional bike lane? Are shared lane markings appropriate for busy streets or only on local roads? This session will analyze the decision-making process that different cities go through when answering such questions, looking beyond speed and ADT to consider elements as varied as context, parking, transit routes and street width.

Presenters:
Joshua Benson, Bicycle and Pedestrian Program Director, New York City Department of Transportation
Nathan Wilkes, Associate Traffic Engineer, Neighborhood Connectivity Division, City of Austin

Lee Shoemaker
Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator
City of Eugene Public Works
99 E. Broadway, Suite 400
Eugene, OR 97401-3174
Voice:  541-682-5471
Fax:  541-682-5598
www.eugene-or.gov/bicycles

Become a League Cycling Instructor

LAB LogoThis June (21st-23rd) the League of American Bicyclists is holding an LCI Seminar in Eugene. The last LAB Seminar in Eugene was over 5 years ago and annually there are fewer than a dozen around the country. Registration so far has been too low to hold this Seminar and there are only a couple more days to register for this great opportunity! If you’ve ever wanted to take your cycling to the next level and wanted to share your knowledge of safe cycling skills with others this is a great opportunity!

Becoming a League Cycling Instructor (LCI) certified to teach Smart Cycling is a great way to help cyclists in your community. Certified instructors can teach Smart Cycling classes to children as well as adults. Help bring the joy of safe cycling to others. If you are an experienced cyclist and would like to teach others please consider taking the next step towards certification. Becoming a League member and taking Traffic Skills 101 are prerequisites for a certification seminar. Instructors are trained at seminars held periodically throughout the year. The training is Friday, June 21 (5:30-9pm), Saturday, June 22 (8am-4pm), and Sunday, June 23 (8am-4pm). Cost for the three day training is $300.

To register you can download the course registration form or go to the League’s website, join and then register via their Events calendar by clicking on the Eugene LCI Seminar . You must be a League member to register for the course (and to maintain the LCI certification). If you have any questions contact Shane MacRhodes (rhodes_sh@4j.lane.edu).

 

Help Provide Bicycling for the Blind

tandem cyclists
EYECYCLE EUGENE PILOTS NEEDED FOR TANDEM BIKING PROGRAM
We are looking for some folks who would like to do some piloting for a tandem bike program for the blind at the City of Eugene Hilyard Community Center. Strong biking skills is an asset. Experience piloting a tandem is not a requirement, because we will train you. If interested or if you have any questions contact —– at 541-682-5311.
Your assistance will be very much appreciated.
 
T. Andy Fernandez, CTRS, CPRP
Section Manager, Senior/Adult & Adaptive Recreation Services
City of Eugene – Library, Recreation & Cultural Services
2580 Hilyard Street
Eugene, OR 97405
541.682.6306 Direct