We’re Alive!

LiveMove Bike Counter Fundraiser

We’re not dead, we’re just resting under a pile of leaves.
Sure it’s a bit wet and slippery out there, so what get out and ride. Here’s a good opportunity to ride AND support LiveMove’s fundraiser at Oakshire tomorrow:

Hi BikeInShapers,

Ever wonder what a parakeet dressed as pug looks like? Or for that matter, how a pug dressed in parakeet suit for Halloween appears? Well, the answer is probably not in this shape. 🙂

On Wednesday, let’s support LiveMove’s Oakshire Fundraiser to get a bike counter installed on 13th & Kincaid. It’s a pricey ambition, so why not throw down a couple pints to move the needle:

http://livemove.org/projects/bike-counter/

We’ll meet at Oakshire at 7pm, this Wednesday Oct. 29th and ride in the shape of the Pugakeet!

See you there or…trick instead of treat!

pugakeet

 

Open House Tonight for Ped/Bike Master Plan

Come to the Library TONIGHT (Thursday, Oct. 2nd) from 5-7pm and give your input on how to make the plan even better! Even since this plan was accepted there has been a shift in how cities are implementing improvements for people walking and biking. Updates to the policy section and the system map will help take Eugene to the next level of walk and bike friendliness. Come give your input on what you want to see for yourself, your family, and your community to make Eugene the best place in the country to choose active transportation!

Here’s more information from the city:

The Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan (PBMP) was accepted by Council in 2012 as an interim guiding document for the development of bicycle and pedestrian projects. It will be adopted as part of the city’s Transportation Systems Plan (TSP) in 2015. There will be an open house on Thursday, October 2nd, 2014 from 5:00pm to 7:00pm at the downtown Eugene Library (100 W 10th Avenue) in the Bascom/Tykeson Room. The purpose of the open house is to verify bicycle and pedestrian projects and policies before they are incorporated into the long-range TSP. Maps and comment forms will be available for you to provide your preferences. Drop in anytime between 5pm and 7pm. For more information click here: www.eugene-or.gov/bikepedplan
IMG_0518.JPG

Things to See In Eugene While Visiting On Bike

Screen Shot 2014-08-19 at 8.49.10 PM

This weekend we have our annual Kidical Mass family bike camping trip and we have a family coming up from Sacramento to join us (Hi Elle!!).  When asked about things to see and do in Eugene in her couple of days before the trip I decided I should write a post about it and get other’s input too. So here are some of my suggestions. Add yours in the comments and I’ll work them into the post to use as a reference for others. This will be mostly focused on families wanting to bike around Eugene. Speaking of which, did you catch that article in Bicycle Times a few months ago titled “The Search for Neverland” about a families bike visit in Eugene? Highly recommended.

Here, in no particular order, are some suggestions for places to see and things to do for families visiting Eugene by bike:

If you’re here on the third Saturday of the month you have to join us for Kidical Mass!

Stop by CAT. The Center for Appropriate Transport can be like a toy shop for both adults and kids who like bikes. They have a rideable museum where you can check out various bikes and take them for a spin around the neighborhood and down to the river path. They also have a DIY shop to fine tune your machines. Good place to top off the air and do your ABC Quick Checks…you do know the ABC Quick Check, right?!  Just be sure you don’t let the kids run back into the powder coating/welding/machine shop area. ..though the bathroom is back in that direction.  Plug the kids into a bike movie and check out all the cool resources.

Explore the Ruth Bascom Riverbank Path system. This is a give me and a must. Here’s a map (pdf). Many of the following places can be found riding along or near the path:

Screen Shot 2014-08-19 at 9.03.18 PM Continue reading “Things to See In Eugene While Visiting On Bike”

David Minor Bikeway Meeting Tuesday

 

The next public meeting regarding the David Minor Bikeway proposal, connecting the UO campus and downtown on 13th with a 2-way separated bikeway, is on June 24th from 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. in the Eugene Library Bascom-Tykeson Room.  Previous meetings have been held and there has been overwhelming support for the project so far. Though a couple businesses have raised concerns about the possible loss of parking other businesses and many community members have expressed an interest in seeing improvements for the corridor. Creating a two-way bike facility will help the wrong-way sidewalk riding that is occurring, providing not only a direct, safe, and comfortable bike connection to and from campus and downtown but also a more pleasant pedestrian environment for those walking the corridor.

 

Even if you have attended previous meetings it will be important to attend this one as well since staff will be presenting information on engineering and signal timing analysis as well as collect feedback on potential design options. City staff still needs to hear from people that this is an important connection to the community and without the students in town to represent that others need to show their support for the potential first real cycle track project in Eugene. If this project goes in and is designed well it could be the first step in connecting up our whole bike network with a core of more comfortable bikeways for all.

 

FINAL_Hillyard2-stretched-1170x400

 

Let city staff know that you want to see a safe and physically protected bikeway here to create a corridor that is better and more predictable for ALL road users. One key piece of the design will be to make the bike and pedestrian movement a priority and not allow the many north-south corridors for cars interrupt the flow for active transportation users.

 

With the Capstone project being completed this summer and our downtown in the midst of a major revitalization it’s essential that this facility happen sooner rather than later. Ask the city to place this project on the front burner for completion in 2015!  Once the city prioritizes the project and moves forward with planning it then the funding search (public and private dollars) can begin in earnest.

 

There is a new web site that has many answers to frequently asked questions about the David Minor Bikeway: http://davidminorbikeway.com. Have a look and we’ll see you on Tuesday, June 24th!

 

UO Bike Program Unveils Repair Trike

To celebrate Earth Week, and to continue in their great program growth, the University of Oregon’s Bike Program is unveiling their new “Mobile Repair Trike” today.  The trike is a collaboration of the Center for Appropriate Transportation (CAT), the Student Sustainability Coalition, and the UO Bike Program.

UO Mobile Repair Trike (photo by Alexander Hongo)

UO Mobile Repair Trike (photo by Alexander Hongo)

The three-wheeled bike features a metal box integrated into the handlebars. The lid of the box slides to one side to serve as a worktable. When extended, a pegboard full of tools slides up within the mechanic’s reach. A lower compartment can store three collapsible bike stands. The tricycle itself is made to haul heavy loads while still being comfortable for any rider. Other nice features include an Alfine 8-speed internal hub and Avid Disc Brakes with a lock setting for parking.

Matt Keller, UO Bike Program Lead Mechanic said, “It will allow us to work on a lot of bikes where they are, so we don’t have to move them.”  This will be particularly important, he says, when the UO Bike share system is online. That bike share system has been delayed with contract negotiations but is speculated to open sometime over the next year (hopefully soon…).

The Mobile Repair Trike will also be used for free repair events on campus and in the community, according to Keeler, like the one happening today from 10 AM – 4 PM across from Lillis Business School on 13th Avenue. Students and community members can stop by with their bikes to have a free safety check from Bike Program staff and volunteers. Anyone stopping will also be able to take a look at the new Mobile repair bike up close and learn more about the UO Bike Program. Continue reading “UO Bike Program Unveils Repair Trike”

Gil Peñalosa & Connecting Communities

This is a guest post by Rob Zako, Executive Director of BEST (Better Eugene Springfield Transit), whose goal is educating the public about and advocating for a regional transit system that fosters prosperity, social equity, and a healthy natural environment.
———-

Did you miss international expert Gil Peñalosa yesterday at the “Connecting Communities” conference?

Watch a video of the full 3-hour event…
Watch Gil Peñalosa give a 15-minute TEDx talk…

Gil is the executive director of the Toronto-based nonprofit 8-to-80 Cities. Their mission is simple and compelling: Everyone has a right to get around safely, quickly and conveniently. This includes 8-year-old children—maybe your own children or grandchildren—who are too young to drive; and people 80-year-old seniors—maybe you, if not now then in a few years—who have lost the ability to drive. If the young and old can get around, then everyone can get around. Making a community that works for everyone is democracy, it is equality, it is respect.

In particular, Gil says we need to design our cities for people who walk, as everyone starts and ends every trip walking, even if just to or from a bicycle rack, a bus stop, or a car parking lot. We need to design our cities for people who ride bicycles, as this is an inexpensive and clean mode of transportation that doesn’t take up too much space in our cities. We need to design our cities for people who ride the bus, as doing so uses finite road capacity more efficiently. And we need to design our cities for people who drive cars or trucks. We need to design our cities for everyone: walking, biking, riding the bus, and driving!
Continue reading “Gil Peñalosa & Connecting Communities”

Stolen Bike Alert- Green Long Haul Trucker Xtracycle

 

Because I can post here 🙂
XtracycleStolen

Stolen from 18th & Chambers Albertsons, Thursday Jan. 16, 5:30 pm. Locked with mini u-lock (almost certainly). Had plain black bag (no patches like in picture), wood snap deck, kickback stand, basket on front of mini front rack. Helmet also stolen with bike (like in bottom photo but with cool reflectors).
No cute kids were stolen.

Police report filed (bike registered).

If seen contact Shane at number below.

Image-1

Comments Sought on Proposals to Change Skateboard, Bike Laws

The City of Eugene will hold a public open house on Monday, Nov. 18, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Eugene Public Library Bascom-Tykeson Room, 100 W. 10th Ave., to present three proposed changes to City bike and skateboard laws. The session will include a staff presentation followed by questions and comments from the public.

Proposal 1: Allow electric assisted bicycles to be ridden on off-street shared use paths. Currently, city code does not allow electric assisted bicycles to be ridden on off-street shared-use paths with the electric assist device engaged although electric bikes are considered bicycles under state law. Eugene’s prohibition is inconsistent with other cities in Oregon. Electric assist bicycles are increasingly popular because they allow users to travel for longer distances, carry more cargo on their bikes, and to get an extra boost when needed.

Proposal 2: Expand the downtown bicycle and skateboard “no sidewalk riding” zone to cover new areas where pedestrian safety concerns have been expressed by the public. Several alternative zones will be presented for consideration inside the area bounded by 6th Avenue, High Street, 13th Avenue and Charnelton Street. This proposal is intended to improve public safety in high-pedestrian areas.

20131114-185729.jpgProposal 3: Allow skateboards to be ridden on city streets. Currently, skateboards cannot be ridden in the portion of a street designated for automobile traffic, except when crossing a street in a crosswalk or at a right angle. Skateboarding is currently completely prohibited in areas of downtown Eugene and near the University of Oregon, where it is also banned on the sidewalks. This proposal would make skateboarding a more viable transportation option especially in areas where it is illegal to ride in the street and on the sidewalk. Skateboarding is increasing as a travel option, and the new WJ Skate Park will generate more demand for skateboarding from current residents and visitors from out of the area.

(Editors note: I have heard from city staff that there are major concerns from the police with this possible change on the skateboard law and that could be a major barrier especially if there isn’t a major advocacy push for this. If there is interest from people to create legal and safe transportation options for people using skateboards then we need people to step up and push for this change! Otherwise it will remain illegal for people to use skateboards on our streets. With changes in board technology, usage, culture, and how we want to use our public space we really need to change this law).

The public input received at this open house will be used to help determine what changes to the code will be recommended to the City Council at a work session in 2014. For more information about the open house or these proposals, contact Bicycle Pedestrian Coordinator Lee Shoemaker at lee.shoemaker@ci.eugene.or.us or 541-682-5471.

Two BPACs Looking for People to Serve

Both the City of Eugene and the City of Springfield are looking for new BPAC members. Apply and get engaged on building a better active transportation environment for our community! Eugene applications are due Nov. 22nd and Springfield on Dec. 2nd.

The City of Eugene is seeking new Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee members.
The application period is open until November 22, 2013. Terms begin in January 2014.
BPAC 2014 Application HERE

Info about Eugene BPAC:

Current Eugene BPAC

Eugene’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee (BPAC) advises the City of Eugene Transportation Planning staff and community organizations and partners on the following:

  • Implementation of the Pedestrian and Bicycle Strategic Plan
  • Community and constituent interests in transportation planning decisions
  • Provides feedback to staff on projects relating to walking and bicycling

BPAC meetings are held on the second Thursday of each month in the Sloat Conference Room at the Eugene Atrium Building (99 W. 10th Ave) from 5:30 to 7:30 pm.Guests and members of the public are always welcome to attend.

All BPAC meetings are open to the public. Guests will be provided with opportunities to speak at the beginning of each meeting.Use the links on the right side of this screen to access meeting notes and related information.

The staff liaison to the BPAC is Lee Shoemaker, Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator. He can be reached at (541) 682-5471.

Applications for Springfield Pedestrian and Bicycle Advisory Committee Available

The City of Springfield is currently seeking applications from Springfield residents to serve on the Pedestrian and Bicycle Advisory Committee; applications will be accepted until December 2 at 5:00 PM. The City will fill up to eight (8) positions on the Committee from the applications received by the deadline.

The Committee provides citizen input on pedestrian and bicycle policies, programs, and facilities. Applicants should have an interest in promoting pedestrian and / or bicycle interests in Springfield. The Committee meets approximately six times each year and candidates will be appointed to serve a two-year term beginning in January 2014.

What: Applications being accepted for Springfield’s Pedestrian and Bicycle Advisory Committee

Who: Springfield residents, electors, or property owners within Springfield’s Urban Growth Boundary can apply.

When: Applications will be accepted until December 2 at 5:00 PM.

Where: Applications are available in the City Manager’s Office at 225 Fifth Street in Downtown Springfield

Additional information:  Contact Molly Markarian, Senior Planner, at 541.726.4611 or email at mmarkarian@springfield-or.gov.

 

South Willamette Street- Time for Action

Today I shared some information with a group that is considering endorsing Option One of the South Willamette Street plan, which is the plan to keep it the way it is. With the long op-ed last week and the signs cropping up on the street saying “Four Lanes for Safety” (a pure untruth) it is time for those who want to see a better street for all to speak up!  Write your council member, attend the City Council meeting next week (Facebook event), write your own letter to the editor and educate your friends and neighbors about Option Three.  City staff are working with EcoNorthwest on an economic impact study and once that is complete the City Council will be making a decision on the matter.  We need to get the information out there that a complete street is a safer street and that we want a vibrant business district where walking and biking (and driving) are better!

Here is what I shared with the group (after giving a brief intro the five E’s of Safe Routes to School):

Alternative Three- Wouldn't that be nice

Alternative Three- Wouldn’t that be nice

Today I am here to talk to you about the E of Engineering and the importance of how we build our transportation system in a way that creates a safe environment for our children. Engineering is the infrastructure piece of how we create safe routes not only to and from our schools but as a whole transportation system for families. Infrastructure dictates behavior and when we build a system that makes it very easy to drive everywhere we get an outcome like the one we find ourselves in today; which is walk and bike rates to school have declined from more than 50% in the 1970’s to down to less than 10% by the 2000’s.  Along with our major decline in students using active transportation to move themselves to and from school we have seen a huge increase in obesity.  We know that our built environment effects how we move around our city and we know we need to make some major changes in our built environment to make active transportation the easier choice for kids and families. We’ve seen it around the world and we’ve seen it right here in Eugene. When you build a better place for families to choose active transportation they make that healthier choice because they like it!