Ask WeBikeEugene: Who Yields at ‘Bike Path’ Crosswalks?

Who stops?

Who yields?

Today’s Ask WeBikeEugene segment answers a question that I asked myself:

I had an interesting interaction with a car driver a few weeks ago at the intersection of the Fern Ridge Bike Path and City View St, where the path has a grade level street crossing and also switches sides of the river. This interaction went far better than an interaction I wrote about last summer, but also raised an interesting question: Exactly who has the right-of-way when the bike paths crosses the road with a crosswalk, the biker or the driver?

In practice, whoever has the right-of-way at these crossings really doesn’t matter. The WBE-recommended method for handling these crossings on a bike is to slow down, make eye contact with any approaching drivers, and then do whatever the driver expects you to do – either cross or stop. Obviously if they stop, you go, and if they go, then you stop. This method keeps everyone alive and happy, and has served me well for years – but what does the law say?

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A Vicarious Participation in The Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan Open House

Partcipants write ideas for improvements on city maps

Two participants discuss the merits of having everyone wear matching Eugene Pedicab hats.

If you missed last Friday’s Ped and Bike Master Plan open house, you really missed out on a lot of fun.  Estimates put the attendance around 70 participants, which helped create a party-like atmosphere full of innovative discussions about fancy new ideas and treatments.

You can still participate in the process on the website, by attending the project advisory committee meeting Oct 25th, by attending the next open house in March, and by coming to the Transportation Remix panel discussion this Friday (There will be beer!)

While all these are great options, they don’t quite give you the experience of attending the event.  This is sad, because it was fun and informative, and full of ideas aimed at increasing cyclist ease and ridership numbers (despite what some negative bloggers who didn’t attend the event would have you believe).

In order to give you a full understanding of the night I will now pass the narrative over to the wonderful George Nellis, a newspaper man who rode his 52 inch “Ordinary” bicycle from New York to San Fransisco in 72 days back in 1887, shattering the previous record by two weeks.  I figure if we are going to live vicariously through anyone, George is a pretty good choice.  Other than being a way bigger bad-ass than me, George’s experience – albeit fictional – was that of going to the open house completely unexposed to much of the innovative infrastructure being proposed – which presents a much more common experience than my policy-wonk steeped experience.  (Kendra says that this entire idea is rather contrived, which is true, but I’ve decided I don’t care.)

Take the jump to start the adventure (and view a PDF of the materials in case you missed it).

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Via SRTS: Pumpkin Kidical Mass Pictures!

This is just so awesome I had to re-post it here. Via Eugene Safe Route to School:

Had a great Kidical Mass ride on Saturday! A good sized group met at RiverPlay and even picked up a family who was just playing at the park and thought the ride sounded fun. We rode through Washington/Jefferson Park, the Whiteaker neighborhood and to the Corner Market (who opened special for us) where we picked out and carved some jack-o-lanterns. More than 35 kids and adults, lot’s of smiles, and some fun pumpkin carving. A great fall day!

Take the jump for a little more about the ride!

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Transportation Remix This Friday

The following is a press release from the City of Eugene:

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Woman Attacked on River Path Near Maurie Jacobs Park

This story showed up tonight at the Register-Guard, KEZI, and KMTR.  I’m going to post the KMTR version because it’s the most thorough.   Please be extra careful out there, especially since it’s getting dark earlier and earlier.


The general area of the attack (click for Google Map)

Via KMTR: Woman attacked on bike path near Maurie Jacobs Park

Eugene Police are putting out information and a suspect description in an assault/attempted rape incident that occurred October 13 around 11:44 p.m. with the hope that someone will have information that can help identify the suspect.

On October 13, a 47-year-old woman was riding her bike home on Maurie Jacobs Park off of Fir and Lombard when an unknown man intercepted her and asked her for a cigarette or a light. While she was looking for one, he pulled her down by the river, and assaulted and attempted to rape her. She was able to successfully fight him off and called 9-1-1.

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[Updated] Ask WeBikeEugene: How often are the off-street paths cleared of leaves?

Slippery when wet!

Before we get this article underway, I’d like to acknowledge that I am, indeed, blatantly ripping off the idea for this feature from BikePortland. If you can’t beat ’em (and who could?) join ’em copy ’em.

Today’s question stems from a hodgepodge of posts that showed up on the GEARs mailing list over the last few days.  Posts like:

“The River Trails were great yesterday!  However, the leaves are falling at a good rate and are starting to cover the pavement in spots, really well, hiding those areas that may cause someone to fall or worse.”

and

“I’d love to know the answer to how often they clear off the river paths.  I roller blade (yesterday) as well as bike (today on my rain bike – ’93 Specialized Rockhopper) and last winter I was EXTREMELY PLEASED to find the paths occasionally cleared.  Or maybe it was my imagination?  Or maybe it was the wind?  I really don’t know.  Does anyone?”

So how often does the City clear the leaves on the off-street (multi-use) bike paths?  Did the budget cuts which we were warned about back in April affect this schedule?  What can we do when we encounter a path blocked by leaves?

These are the questions that I asked the City of Eugene’s intrepid Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator Lee Shoemaker.  I summarize and expand on his answers after the jump!

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Ped/Bike Master Plan Open House and October InMotion

Click for full-size

There is a lot happening this October in the Eugene bike planning world, most notably the Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan Open House on October 14th and the Transportation Remix on October 22nd.

I’ll post about how awesome the Transportation Remix will be a little closer to the date, but for now I’d like to focus on the importance of the Ped/Bike Master Plan Open House.   This project will provide a long-term guide for how cycling infrastructure is implemented in Eugene, and this open house will be a great way for you to give valuable input.  If you can’t make the open house, don’t panic; the Ped/Bike Plan website has other ways for you to contribute.

When: Thursday, October 14th, 4:30 to 6:30 PM

Where: Monroe Middle School, 2800 Bailey Lane

Also included in this post (after the jump) is the City of Eugene’s October InMotion Newsletter.  It’s full of great information, including the above events, an opportunity to win an iPad, several public input opportunities for LTD projects and Envision Eugene, construction updates, and a whole bunch of other fun events.

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Cyclists Take to Other Human Powered Vehicles for River Cleanup

Originally posted on EugeneGEARs.org

Last weekend was the 2nd annual “Great Willamette Clean-Up” and a couple of local cyclists took to some water based human powered crafts to help out in the effort. The River Path is the most important recreation and transportation system in our community, and keeping the river healthy and clean is an important part of it. Here’s a bit of a report back from their work on the “Urban Willamette”:

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How to Waterproof Your Xtracycle


An Xtracycle is a terrible thing to waste, protect it!

Xtracycles are wonderful things.  They are the El Camino or Minivan of the bike world, and they are immensely popular here in the Northwest.  When I first built up my Xtracycle two and a half years ago, I’d only seen one or two others around town.  Now I see them everywhere. I think I still might be the only one in Eugene who rides one without kids, however. Mine is mainly used for commuting loads, juggling gear and unicycles, groceries, free piles, and giving drunk friends a ride home from the bar.

Xtracycles do have one minor flaw.* They were originally designed for use down south in California, and thus are not ready for a Northwest winter without a little modification.   But, never fear, those modifications are cheap and easy and I’m here to show you how to waterproof your Xtracycle and gear.  I’ve put over 7,500 miles of daily, rear-round riding on my Xtracycle with these modifications, and I have almost no rust in my frame and my Snapdeck still looks like new (sort of).

* It is now possible to purchase an Xtracycle more suited for the Northwest using a TekDeck or FlightDeck, Watchamacollars, and their new bags.

Take the jump for the steps you can take to make sure your Xtracycle lasts for years and years!

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Bike Commute Challenge Ends, Katura Crowned 2010 Supreme WeBikeEugene Badass

Katura Reynolds: The 2010 WeBikeEugene Supreme Badass

The BTA’s 2010 Bike Commute Challenge has ended.  They’ll present the winners in Portland on Oct. 7th at some sort of big party, but WeBikeEugene has our results now!

The winner of the WBE Bike Commute Challenge is Katura Reynolds with 335 miles and a 100% commute rate.  Katura has officially earned the “2010 WeBikeEugene Supreme Badass Award.”

The final results of the participating WBE “staff”:

Katura Reynolds – Team Mt. Pisgah Arboretum – 335 Miles, 100% Commute Rate

Kendra Seager -Team 4J School District – 309 Miles, 100% Commute Rate

Mike Seager – Team 4J School District – 281 Miles, 100% Commute Rate

Shane MacRhodes – Team 4J School District – 152 Miles, 100% Commute Rate