Featured

South Willamette bike lane striping delayed until June

The re-striping of south Willamette Street, which will add bike lanes from 24th to 29th avenues, has been delayed for a few weeks.

Crews have marked out the new configuration of the street, and the actual re-striping was expected in the next week or so.

Spray-painted white markings show where the new pavement striping will go.

Spray-painted white markings show where the new pavement striping will go.

But the contractor hired to do the striping had a conflict and is not available for few weeks, City of Eugene Transportation Planning Engineer Chris Henry told a meeting Thursday of the Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Committee. The striping should be completed by mid-June, Henry said.

Featured

May Is Bike Month

May is going to be a GREAT month for biking in Eugene! It’s a good time for fair-weather cyclists to roll those steads out of the garage and for everyone who rides bikes to celebrate together. With over 25 bike rides and events happening during Bike Month it’s the perfect time to try out something new! Usually ride for recreation? Try out commuting! Casual cyclist who only rides for errands? Try a longer recreational ride! Want to get your kids riding more? We’ve got events for you!

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Bike Month Highlights

For a calendar of Bike Month of the 25+ events click here. More events added as submissions come in. See how many you can do! Scroll below for complete descriptions of each event.

May 1-31: Walk & Bike Challenge
May 3: Bike Maintenance Basics: Level 1
May 4: National Bike to School Day
May 4: Oakshire Inspires- Fundraiser for Bike Safety Education
May 5: Hands-on Bike Maintenance: Drivetrain
May 7: Bikes to Blooms Wildflower Tour
May 7: Mohawk Valley Metric Century: A Pedal for People
May 8: Eugene CycloFemme Ride
May 10: Bike Touring 101
May 12: Bike In Shapes Oregon Trail Ride
May 13: Bicycle Touring: Local Trips, Routes & Gear
May 14: Confident Cycling for Families Class
May 14: Traffic Skills 101
May 14: 3rd Annual BicyClean River Path Clean-up
May 14: Mckenzie Pass GEARs Ride
May 14: Cycle Away Cancer
May 14-20: Business Commute Challenge
May 17: Breakfast at the Bike Bridges- DeFazio Bridge
May 17: Ankeny Wildlife Refuge Ride
May 18: Eugene Ride of Silence
May 18: Tour of Rolf Prima Wheels – “Built Right. Here.”
May 19: Mountain Biking 101
May 20: National Bike to Work Day
May 20: Family Biking Social: From Everyday Transport to Full On Adventures
May 20: Springfield Wheels by the Willamette
May 21: Kidical Mass Prince Ride (With Madi Carlson)
May 21: Mountain Bike Trail Build Day
May 21: Funktastic Moonlight Mash and KWVA Birthday Bash!
May 21: Cinnamon Roll Ride
May 22: Eugene Triple Peak VII Ride
May 22: Women’s Road Biking Basics Clinic and Group Ride
May 26: Life Cycle Ladies MTB Social
May 27: Breakfast at the Bike Bridges


Host Your Own Ride!

We’re excited to get more people organizing their own fun rides. Simply make up your own ride and register it here. We’ll post it here and on the Community Bike Calendar.


Bike Month Events & Descriptions

Tuesday, May 3rd

Bike Maintenance Basics: Level 1, Eugene REI, 7-8:30 pm

If you ride a bicycle, then you need this class! In this informative session you will learn how to lube a chain, fix a flat tire in record time, and make other minor adjustments to your bicycle that will keep you riding smoothly and prolong your bike’s life. No experience necessary! Note that this is a demonstration class; please do not bring your bike. Register here.


Wednesday, May 4th

National Bike to School Day, All Eugene and Springfield Schools, All Day Long
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Various events at area schools to encourage families and kids to bike to school. If you only bike to school one day a year…you’re crazy. Bike more! But if you can only bike one day, make it this one

Wednesday, May 4th

Oakshire Inspires, Oakshire Brewing, 11 am- 10 pm

A Fundraiser for Eugene-Springfield Safe Routes to Schools Bike Safety Education in Schools. End your ride with a pint at Oakshire! $1 from every pint sold will be donated to the Eugene Springfield Safe Routes to Schools program to help fund Bicycle Safety Education classes throughout the 4J, Bethel, and Springfield school districts. Do it for the kids.
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Thursday, May 5th

Your bike’s drive train is a key component to efficient riding. Join REI’s certified bike techs to learn about your drive train as well as how to inspect, maintain and adjust front & rear derailleurs to make sure your ride is as smooth as possible. Register here.

Saturday, May 7th

Mohawk Valley Metric Century, Armitage Park, 7 am- 3 pm
Mohawk Valley Metric
The Mohawk Valley Metric Century is a benefit for Oregon Supported Living Program’s Arts & Culture Program, one of the few truly integrated arts programs in the nation serving people of all ability levels. Every single adult with a developmental disability who participates in the Arts & Culture Program is low income. While people with disabilities have their most basic needs met through the state and insurance, they have little to nothing left over for education, personal growth, and joy.  Facebook event.

Saturday, May 7th

Bikes to Blooms Wildflower Tour, Coast Fork Willamette Watershed Council (28 S 6th St, Ste A, Cottage Grove), 8 am- 1 pm

The public is invited to the third annual Bikes to Blooms Wildflower Tour Saturday May 7th 8am-2pm at two locations along Dorena Lake—Bake Stewart Park and Row Point. You can explore a series of rare, remnant prairie habitats with local plant experts who will interpret these sites for the public at this free event sponsored by the Row River Partnership.
Six free wildflower tours for all knowledge levels will be offered at a range of times between 9:30am and 12:30pm, each an opportunity to learn about the wildflowers that bloom each spring, the habitats, and parks where they reside. Visitors are also welcome to visit the booths of partner organizations and local groups at Bake Stewart Park from 9am-1pm during the event. Brand new to the event this year, the Coast Fork Birders will be hosting a morning bird walk at 8am at Bake Stewart Park. All tours are accessible by car, and carpooling is encouraged as parking is limited. Participants should bring a picnic lunch, water, weather-appropriate clothing, weed-free shoes, and a helmet if cycling. Please no dogs. See www.coastfork.org or call (541)767-9717 for more information

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Sunday, May 8th

Eugene CycloFemme Ride, Owen Rose Garden, 1:30 pm

A Slow paced social bike ride celebrating women on wheels. CycloFemme is a socially-driven grass-roots celebration of women on bikes. Our annual Mother’s Day ride unites riders, regardless of gender, age, ethnicity or bicycle preference to share in the joy of cycling. Presenting Sponsors: City of Eugene Transportation Planning and Arriving By Bike. Visit http://cyclofemme.com/ for more information on the worldwide celebration.

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Tuesday, May 10th

Bike Touring 101, UO Outdoor Program/Bike Program (1225 E. 18th Ave.), 6-8 pm
Ready for your next adventure on two wheels? Gather pro-tips and fun stories at our Bike Touring 101 interactive presentation! Experienced bike tour adventurers will share their stories, pictures, and advice for the best touring experience on any budget!
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Thursday, May 12th

Bike In Shapes Oregon Trail Ride, Autzen Footbridge to the Claim 52 Abbey in Springfield, 7 pm

Bike in Shapes is a monthly group bicycle ride jaunt and gathering. Prancing Pigs, Oregon Maps, Mondrian Art, Fractal Trees, Pac Man Ghosts…if it’s a shape, they’ll trace and ride it! Each ride is tapped off with some local suds and laughs.

Set your axles and pull the reins, it’s May is Bike Month! and time for Bike in Shapes Oregon Trail ride. Meet on top the Autzen Footbridge at 7pm and pioneer over through Springfield to the Claim 52 Abbey at Sprout regional food hub (418 A Street). Thanks to wonderful folks at the Claim 52 Abbey for hosting.

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Friday, May 13th

Bicycle Touring: Local Trips, Routes & Gear, Arriving By Bike (2705 Willamette St.), 6:30-9 pm

Come over to Arriving By Bike on Friday, May 13th, at 7 pm and get stoked for summer adventures by bike! Route planning, maps and apps, gear, bike repair and more! Let us help you get ready (and possibly start planning) a bike tour.

Bike over early at 6:30 pm for the “Touring Bikes by the Bench” pre-party if you would like to check-out other bike tourists bike and gear carrying set-ups. Bring your own to share! At 7 pm the featured speaker will share their bike touring stories and advice and get us stoked for adventuring by bike!


May 14th- 20th

Business Commute Challenge, Your Workplace, All Week Long
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Join a friendly competition – workplace against workplace – to see who can walk, bike, bus, carpool, or telecommute the most the week of May 14th-20th. The workplace with the highest participation wins, along with great prizes for individuals! Whether you’re a bus rider, you’re thinking about trying bike commuting for the first time,or you want to have fun with your co-workers… this Challenge is for you! Sign up, register your business or office as a team, and join the fun!  Prizes, challenges, support, exercise, community, and FUN! Register. Walk. Bike. Bus. Pool. Click. Win. The more you participate the more chances you have to win. Facebook page.

Saturday, May 14th

Traffic Skills 101 Class, Whiteaker Community Center, 9 am-5 pm

This class informs and covers the skills and techniques to give riders the confidence they need to ride safely and legally in traffic and on the trails. The course covers bicycle safety checks, fixing a flat, on-bike riding skills and crash avoidance techniques and includes a student manual. Recommended for adults and children above age twelve, this fast-paced, nine-hour course prepares cyclists for a full understanding of vehicular cycling and is a great resource for cyclists from beginning to experienced. A safe bike and helmet are needed in this class. Certification, League of American Bicyclists’ Road 1, is achieved upon the successful completion of this course and is the first step to become a League Cycling Instructor (LCI). Eugene will be hosting an LCI Seminar in June. This class has a $40 fee. Register here.
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Saturday, May 14th

BicyCLEAN River Clean-Up, UO Outdoor Program/Bike Program (1225 E. 18th Ave), 9 am

Bicyclean

On the third annual BicyClean, we will be working in small teams to sustainably clear every mile of the main bike paths around Eugene by bicycle. Come make new bike friends, eat delicious free snacks, and win raffle prizes. Sign-up on the UO Outdoor Program website. Free.


Saturday, May 14th

McKenzie Pass GEARs Ride, Meet at Alton Baker Park, 8:30 am

Meet at 8:30 am Alton Baker Park, to carpool or meet at McKenzie Bridge Ranger Station. Weather dependent, check website for alternate route.

RIDE: McKenzie Bridge Ranger Station to Hwy 242 Observatory and back; 12-15 mph, 48 miles. Led by Jackie Murdoff; RSVP to jmurdoff@comcast.net.

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Saturday, May 14th

Cycle Away Cancer, Tacovore, 9:30 am

Most of us know someone who has battled Cancer. Please join us on May 14, at Tacovore for a 54 mile benefit ride to raise money to help Cancer Patients in Lane County. The event is FREE. All we ask is that you bring some amount to donate… you decide how much. ALL donations will be going to the Oregon Cancer Foundation, here in Lane County. Invite your friends!


Tuesday, May 17th

Breakfast at the Bridges, DeFazio Bridge (EWEB side), 7-9:30 am
Breakfast at the Bike BridgesEnjoy Free Coffee, Bagels, Basic Bike Tune-Ups, Bike Registration by the Eugene Police, and biking and walking safety information. is designed for path users and commuters to grab a quick bite to eat and a cup of coffee, meet City staff, learn more about transportation in Eugene, and get a bicycle safety check all at the same time.  This signature event series celebrates the outdoors and encourages active transportation – especially walking and bicycling – to meet larger City goals, including: healthy living, sustainability and a vibrant business community. Breakfast at the Bridges features local advocacy organizations and local businesses who actively work toward these City goals. Full City Coffee, Bagel Sphere and Nancy’s, free bells, and bike registration at the event with bike safety checks by a local bike shop.

Tuesday, May 17th

More information and registration at Obsidians.org

Wednesday, May 18th

Ride of Silence, Educational Memorial Plaza (Bailey Hill Road), 6 pm

ROS

The ride will start at 6:30pm  from the Educational Memorial Plaza on Bailey Hill Road, please arrive at 6pm for the reading of the names of members of our community who have lost their lives on the road, and to hear the invited speaker. The ride will end at the David Minor Theater, where we will gather to hear stories about our love ones that we have lost cycling on our public streets.


Wednesday, May 18th

Tour of Rolf Prima Wheels, “Built. Right. Here.”, Rolf Prima Factory (940 Wilson Street), 3:30 pm

Wheels. They are essential to our bikes, but we often don’t pay much attention to them. That is until something goes wrong…a busted spoke, a bent rim, loose bearings. Then we’re going nowhere…fast! Come learn more about these essential parts of our bikes from the experts, the craftsmen at Rolf Prima Wheels. On Wednesday, May 18th, at 3:30 they are opening the doors of their manufacturing plant to show us how they make some of the fastest, strongest, best-built wheels in the world.

You can meet us at the Rolf Prima Factory at 3:30. But better yet, let’s gather at Oakshire Brewery at 207 Madison St at 3:00 and bike over together to Rolf Prima. It’s only a couple of miles. After the tour, we can back back to Oakshire and enjoy a cold beer and talk about wheels!

Any questions, contact Lyn Gilman-Garrick at lyngg@efn.org.

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Thursday, May 19th

Mountain Biking 101, UO Outdoor Program/Bike Program (1225 E. 18th Ave), 6-8 pm

Have you been wanting to give mountain biking a try but aren’t sure what you’ll need, where to go or who to go with? Are you tired of riding Ridgeline but don’t know where else to go in Eugene? Come hear the Disciples of Dirt talk about the best mountain biking trails near Eugene, what goes into making those trails and to connect with other riders who share your enthusiasm for single track. Everyone is welcome, no mountain biking experience necessary. Free.


Friday, May 20th

Springfield Wheel’s by the Willamette, Riverpath at Aspen & D St., 4-6 pm

Friday, May 20th

Family Biking Social: From Everyday Transport to Full On Adventures, The Barn Light East (545 E. 8th Ave), 6:30-8:30 pm

A special presentation and inspiration from local & national experts to help you take the first steps to getting your family on bikes or to take your riding adventures to the next level.

Special guest Madi Carlson, Seattle family biking rock star and author of “Urban Cycling”. Plus other local experts talking about family bike adventures near and far. Whether you want to figure out how to get your kids to school, do a basic grocery run, or plan an overnight camping trip we’ll have some good tips and tricks to share!

Social hour mixing, presentation and Q&A. Free event. Food provided. Cash bar.

Sponsored by: LiveMove, Sustainable Cities Initiative, Arriving By Bike™ & Eugene-Springfield Safe Routes to School

Madi Urban Cycling

Friday, May 20th

National Bike to Work Day, Everywhere, All Day Long
If you only bike to work one day during the Business Commute Challenge this is the day to do it!
Bike to Work Day

 Saturday, May 21st

Kidical Mass Prince Ride, Monroe Park, 2 pm
kidical_mass_logoWEB

Join Kidical Mass as they welcome Madi Carlson, author of “Urban Cycling” and family biking rock star from Seattle, who will be in town for a couple special events including taking part in one of the classic Kidical Mass rides from Monroe Park to Prince Pucklers ice cream/playground. This will be a fun ride for everyone. Come out and ride with a bunch of great people, play at two playgrounds, and have some great local ice cream. Does life get much better?

We’ll also be rocking some Prince tunes so feel free to dress in whatever themed clothing you think might fit…but definitely something you can dance in.


 Saturday, May 21st

Mountain Bike Trail Work Day, UO Outdoor Program/Bike Program (1225 E. 18th Ave), 8 am- 6 pm
Join the UO Bike Program and Disciples of Dirt on the trail to see what goes into to building sustainable mountain bike trails. Learn the strategies that go into building your favorite features and meet other people who share your enthusiasm for mountain biking. This is a hand on opportunity to fully participate in the mountain bike community. Tools and guidance will be provided. Refreshments will be provided after the work day, potential trail riding if conditions allow. Sign-up required, sign-up here.
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 Saturday, May 21st

A family-friendly celebration of people on bicycles under the light of the full moon.

Grab your bicycle, strap a boom box in your basket, and pedal over to Kesey Square at 7:30pm to embark on a musical journey from funk’s beginnings to today as we ride under the light of the full moon from downtown Eugene, over the river, and through campus to the historic WOW hall for a FREE show at 9pm when Alvin & the Chipfunks open for the funky sounds of Soul Vibrator. Visit KWVAradio.org or moonlightmash.com for more info, or just show up for the ride at 7:30 at Broadway and Willamette on May 21st.

That’s right, KWVA will be broadcasting our playlist, so any ‘Masher can tune in to 88.1fm and bump beats in sync with the boombakfiets! Visit your local second hand store, find a jambox, stock up on D-cells, bolt a basket to your handlebars, and put some ROCK in your ROLL!

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 Saturday, May 21st

 Cinnamon Roll Ride, Meet at Alton Baker Park, 9 am

It’s that time again! The Yummy Cinnamon Roll Ride!

This is the annual “pedal to Paula’s and have a cinnamon roll feast” bicycle ride. Paula Erickson, past president of Gears, makes the most scrumptious cinnamon rolls! Come try them out. Plus, there is lots and lots of great food! This is a feast to celebrate riding your bike and a chance to met other cyclists.

This is a 35-42 mile roundtrip ride (depending on which group you decide to ride with. There will be a 10-12 mph and 12-15 mph led ride). There is a sag vehicle which can give you a ride back to the starting point if you are too tired or FULL, to make the ride back. Meet at Alton Baker Park at 9:00 am, Saturday May 21st. The ride will take us out to the Fern Ridge area.

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Sunday, May 22nd

Eugene Triple Peak VII, Meet at Eugene Amtrak Train Station, 9 am- 5pm

We’re at it again, this time with the sun’s warmth at our back, the exploding green of the valley at our finger tips, and trails dripping with gold.

0900: Depart from Amtrak obelisk by bicycle (4th & Willamette) –> Run/hike Spencer’s butte summit via Martin St. Trailhead
1200: Depart from Martin St. Trailhead via bicycle and roll towards pisgah via 30th –> summit by foot
1500: Depart from Pisgah as one glittery unit toward Skinner’s Butte columns via the river path –> a final summit by foot. For glory!

Disclaimer: It’s not a race! It’s a running, biking, social event! Run the buttes & bike between. You can do it!

What to bring: Water, nourishing snacks, a layer, bike lock, whiskey, sunscreen if that’s your jam, golden chocolate, trotting shoes, bicycle or willing toter, prefontaine’s spirit, and an athletic friend. Spoke cards & an opportunity for glory provided. See you there!

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Sunday, May 22nd

Women’s Road Biking Basics Clinic and Group Ride, Collins Cycle Shop, 12-3 pm

FREE women specific clinic. Topics covered will include:
How to change a flat, what you need to have with you on a ride, how to ride more comfortably, how to ride safely in a group and more!

At 1:00 they will go on a group ride. If the group is large enough they will split into 2 pace groups with one going 15 miles and the other going 25 miles. Please use this link to register! http://womenroadbikingbasics.eventbrite.com/.


Sunday, May 22nd

Confident Cycling for Families Class, Roosevelt Middle School, 9 am-Noon 

Class attendees will not only learn about basic traffic skills but also learn how to perform a bicycle safety check, how to properly fit a helmet, how to size a bicycle for a child, and how to properly carry things on a bicycle. Information will also be provided about gear and clothing, proper lighting, use of lights, and locking a bike. Half the course will be conducted indoors and the last portion will be held in the parking lot with skills & drills before a final ride on neighborhood streets. This class is made for parents AND kids so all participants are asked to bring a bicycle and a helmet with them to class. Some reduced cost helmets will be available. Anyone requiring a loaner bicycle for the class is asked to state that in the comments section of the registration form. This class is geared towards children ages 5 – 13 and is free and open to all families but registration is required.

Confident Cycling for Families

Thursday, May 26th

LifeCycle Ladies MTB Social, LifeCycle Bike Shop, 6-8 pm

Ladies! Let’s get together and celebrate our passion for riding trails! Come on out to Life Cycle Bike Shop for an after hours women’s specific mountain bike “meet, greet and learn” social! We’ll have a Fix a Flat practice and competition station, and presentations by local experts on women’s specific cycling nutrition, bike fit, and trail survival techniques for those unexpected mechanical emergencies. Sign up for build days and group rides with your local IMBA Chapter. Learn about women’s specific skills clinics happening in your area and beyond. Sample nutrition bars and other tasty delights created by women, for women! Enjoy some tasty beverages and connect with other awesome ladies who love to ride! Free.

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Thursday, May 26th

Business Commute Challenge Wrap-up Party, Eugene Wine Cellars (255 Madison Ave.), 4-6:30pm

Awards presented, pick-up prizes, appetizers, $1 off beverages, and live music. 

Party


Friday, May 27th

Breakfast at the Bridges, Blue Heron Bridge, 7 – 9:30 am (Behind Caesar Chavez Elementary School).  

Bike Month Wrap-up celebration!

Breakfast at the Bridges is designed for path users and commuters to grab a quick bite to eat and a cup of coffee, meet City staff, learn more about transportation in Eugene, and get a bicycle safety check all at the same time.  This signature event series celebrates the outdoors and encourages active transportation – especially walking and bicycling – to meet larger City goals, including: healthy living, sustainability and a vibrant business community. Breakfast at the Bridges features local advocacy organizations and local businesses who actively work toward these City goals. Full City Coffee, Bagel Sphere and Nancy’s, free bells, and bike registration at the event with bike safety checks by a local bike shop.

Blue heron Bridge


Saturday-Sunday, 28th-29th

Group Bike Overnighter (Sub24Overnighter)

None organized yet, but it would be awesome….why don’t YOU organize one?!

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Now… keep riding!

Knickerbocker Bridge Closure

The City of Eugene posted the following road construction advisory:

South Bank Path (Knickerbocker Bridge to Walnut Street): The South Bank Path is closed for construction between Walnut Street and Knickerbocker Bridge until mid-November. Path users should travel on the North Bank Path and the Autzen Bridge. The old path is being replaced with new concrete and will be slightly realigned. The Knickerbocker Bridge will receive new railing.

Ward 1 City Council candidates on transportation: A WeBikeEugene survey

WeBikeEugene distributed a questionnaire to all five candidates running to fill the City Council seat of outgoing Councilor George Brown in Eugene’s Ward 1.

We asked eight questions about transportation issues, particularly active transportation (same questions we posed earlier to the mayoral candidates).

Of the five Ward 1 candidates, three answered the questions: Emily Semple, Joshua Skov and Chris Wig. (Chad Anderson and Kelly Boyd have not responded.)

The candidates’ answers are published below verbatim, without editing except to correct obvious typographical errors. We thank them for their time.

Question 1

Please give us a brief assessment of what you see as the major strengths and deficiencies of Eugene’s transportation system (not so much air or rail, but the system most of use daily to get around town)?

Chad Anderson

[awaiting response]

Kelly Boyd

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

Like most cities in America, Eugene seems to rely on those modes of transportation that leave the heaviest carbon footprint: cars, trucks and (non-electric) buses. We need to improve the ease, attractiveness, and safety of walking and biking, as well as improving the efficiency of mass transit in order to decrease carbon emissions.

I am glad we have our buses but we have lost many routes and frequency of buses. We need to replace and add to routes and schedules so more people will find buses convenient to use. This is especially a problem on Sundays. We are moving toward more and more electric buses to lessen air pollution and this is a trend we need to continue.

I use our bike paths and lanes and would not ride my bike nearly as much without them. It is good to see them well-used and we need more. I would like to see more off road or buffered bike lanes which are safer, especially for children.

We have a huge problem with bicycle theft in this town. We need more secure places to lock bikes. I will also encourage etching id on bikes. A shared bicycle program would be wonderful, allowing many more people to use biking for transportation without the upfront cost of a bike.

Joshua Skov

We have many strengths:

  • Many walkable neighborhoods.
  • A tremendous system of bicycle lanes and paths, especially for recreation.
  • Not a lot of car traffic.
  • A transit system that is one of the best in the country for a community of our scale.
  • Culture – a driver culture of tolerance and care toward alternative modes (compared to other places), and a vibrant bicycle culture.
  • A policy commitment to Vision Zero by the City and the transit district.

At the same time, we have some deficiencies:

  • Many neighborhoods lack complete sidewalk networks, or even safe non-sidewalk routes.
  • Our bicycle network is patchy, with some big missing elements.
  • A too-slow pace of funding strategic pedestrian/bike investments, and little institutional flexibility for funding investments to accompany our narrowly defined pavement preservation program.
  • Little coherence regarding the implementation of Vision Zero.
  • A focus on parking that fails to acknowledge the legacy of too-high parking requirements in other communities, technological change (e.g., such as the possibility of autonomous ridesharing vehicles), shifts in preferences among millennials (away from the car), the high cost of providing so much parking.

CHRIS WIG

I believe major strengths of Eugene’s transportation system include establishing Bus Rapid Transit as the backbone of our transit system, following through on our commitment to make public transportation more environmentally friendly by purchasing more electric buses and empowering citizens to get involved in creating the transit system of the future (e.g. Eugene Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee, MovingAhead Sounding Board, etc.).

One of our greatest transportation infrastructure challenges is the lack of protected bike lanes and a shortage of well-maintained sidewalks. In order to convince everyday people to utilize environmentally friendly modes of transportation we must first convince them that active modes of transportation are safe. We must also continue to replace our old diesel buses with new electric buses to reduce the carbon footprint of our transit network.

Question 2

If elected, what transportation-related improvements, if any, would you want to make a priority? How would you suggest they be funded?

CHAD ANDERSON

[awaiting response]

KELLY BOYD

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

I would like to see us investigate free buses. Corvallis does this so we could look at their model. I realize this will take time and cooperation with Lane County, state and federal governments as well as creative funding.

However, free buses would allow many people to not need or use cars, dramatically reducing carbon emissions in accordance with our Climate Protection Ordinance.

Joshua Skov

Two thoughts.

First, apart from specific improvements, I will simply bring a different tone and attitude to Council, when it comes to pedestrian and bicycle investments. I viscerally understand the situation of people on foot and on bike, and I will represent them. Furthermore, I understand the connections between active modes and our high-level policy objectives and broadly held community values – on climate change, health, safety for physically vulnerable populations, and affordability for working families and especially low-income households.

Second, here’s a quick list, though I am sure these will change over time:

  • Fully funded Pedestrian Bicycle Master Plan: I will push for a schedule of full funding of the Pedestrian Bicycle Master Plan projects on a reasonable timeframe, perhaps 20 years or less. I think these investments should be funded at least in part through the pavement preservation bond measure (see #5 below) and the existing gas tax, though I will look for other funding as well. Other communities (e.g. Portland) have tried additional gas taxes, for example.
  • Explicit support and funding for innovation: We know that we don’t yet have all of the necessary tools in our infrastructure toolbox, so we need to empower City staff to seek designs and innovations from elsewhere – and implement them here. Just as we have learned from the Alder cycle track, we will learn from other innovation. (I keep looking for a candidate for the protected intersection!).
  • More Sunday Streets: Our two annual Sunday Streets celebrations have been wildly popular (4,000 people downtown, 3,500 in the Friendly), and they represent a way to transform local culture to be more open to walking and biking. They also don’t cost the City very much. We should find cultural program funding and outside sponsorship opportunities to make many more of them happen, perhaps eight to 10 per summer.
  • More Complete Safe Routes to School Integration: We already have a potent Safe Routes to School program, but it should have more influence in City investments so we can ensure that all children have safe non-motorized routes to school. This goal should inform our prioritization of bond money (again, see #5).

CHRIS WIG

I strongly support the expansion of the EmX along Highway 99, Coburg Road and River Road/30th Ave. Improving public transit on corridors targeted by the MovingAhead project will provide safe, accessible and environmentally friendly transportation for neighborhoods that are currently underserved by these services. This extension is essential to helping Eugene reduce its carbon footprint and to serve as a model for other mid-size communities to follow our lead.

I also believe the city should install a significant quantity of secure bike storage lockers downtown to protect and encourage active transportation and work with the Eugene Police Department to create a bike theft task force.

Question 3

The city’s Transportation System Plan, intended to guide transportation policy through 2035, is now in draft form and is expected to go to council for adoption later in 2016 or early 2017. Goals of the plan include a focus on reducing “drive-alone” automobile trips and doubling trips made by transit, bicycling and walking. Do you support these goals; that is, do you see value in encouraging more use of “active modes”? Why or why not? If so, how do you see us achieving those goals?

CHAD ANDERSON

[awaiting response]

KELLY BOYD

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

I absolutely support these goals. More active modes of transportation have many benefits: less carbon output, less wear on roads, more exercise resulting in better physical and mental health, more connection with nature and the outdoors, and a better feeling of community with a slower pace and interaction with other walkers and riders.

Safer and more bike paths and sidewalks will draw more people to biking and walking.

More free parking lots near outer bus terminals could reduce drive-alone trips. People would drive shorter distances from home to the parking lots rather than all the way to their destinations.

Joshua Skov

I completely support these goals, just as I pushed for them when I was on the Pedestrian Bicycle Master Plan Citizens Advisory Committee. I see tremendous value – economic, social, health, environmental – in fostering this modal shift.

We will achieve this goals by fostering the right culture and building the right infrastructure. As a city councilor, I will do both. First, I look forward to being a conspicuous pedestrian and bicyclist as an elected official, and a supporter of the huge amount of good work being done by so many people in the community. Second, I will advocate for building out the system we should already have, such as the one described in the Pedestrian Bicycle Master Plan.

CHRIS WIG

I support setting goals to reduce automobile trips and substantially increase the number of community members who choose to use active transportation. Achieving these goals is an essential component to reducing carbon pollution and meeting the benchmarks established in the Climate Recovery Ordinance.

We can accomplish these objectives by supporting compact urban development as our city grows and by making it safer and easier to bike or walk. As we grow, we must remain mindful of who could be left out when we limit the discussion to prioritizing active transportation alone: seniors and other people with mobility challenges. We need to ensure our transportation infrastructure is ADA accessible, not just “accessible.”

Question 4

What is your primary mode of transportation to and from work? Do you ever use other modes? If not, have you considered other modes, and what has kept you from trying them?

CHAD ANDERSON

[awaiting response]

KELLY BOYD

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

I have lived in downtown Eugene for thirty years and started my graphic design business, Semple Design, 15 years ago. For all that time, I have been lucky enough to work at home or have an easy walk to my office.

In the summer, I often ride my bike but my primary mode of transportation is walking. I only use my car when I need to purchase something I cannot carry or from a distant store.

Joshua Skov

Our household (the relevant unit of analysis here, as we are a family of four) is split mainly between biking and driving. We have one car, used primarily for shuttling kids to activities in bad weather or at considerable distances; otherwise, we bike to work and school whenever circumstances permit. Also, the parent without the car (usually me!) commutes by bike.

We use the bus, but rarely, but only because the car and the bicycle are typically more convenient and faster. At times in the past, when the routes and our needs have matched up well, we have been regular bus users.

I believe my regular use of the bicycle makes me empathize better than I would otherwise with people who rely on walking, bicycling, and transit. It also gives me insights into those needs. I will bring that empathy and insight to council decision making.

CHRIS WIG

I walk or drive to work depending on whether or not I will be working at more than one office throughout the day, the location of any responsibilities I may have after work and the weather. I am excited for the completion of the West Eugene EmX line, and for the first time since I graduated from college I am considering using public transit as my primary mode of transportation to work.

Question 5

Eugene’s 2012 pavement bond measure allocates about $8 million a year for five years to resurface and repair city streets. Of that $516,000 annually (about 6 percent) is allocated to support bicycle and pedestrian projects. Will you support a renewal of this bond measure when it expires? Do you think there should be any change in the allocation to bicycle/pedestrian focused projects?

CHAD ANDERSON

[awaiting response]

KELLY BOYD

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

I will support a renewal of the pavement bond measure. I believe the portion of non-road money should be increased to be used for sidewalk repair, safer street crossings, and more bicycle lanes. With more walking and biking, there will be less wear and tear on our roads allowing us to spend less money maintaining our streets.

Joshua Skov

I will absolutely support the bond measure next time around, as we have a tremendous backlog of transportation system repairs that are desperately necessary. The measure was popular (passing with over 60 percent of the vote), which demonstrates that people understand the need and are willing to pay for it.

I’m hoping we have a change in allocation and approach with the next bond measure. First, given the centrality of pedestrian and bicycle modes to major policy objectives – land use, climate action, and health, to name a few – we need councilors who are willing to push staff and members of the Street Repair Review Panel (SRRP) to more fully support a build-out of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure.

That said, I am cognizant of the political danger of this allocation. I have no doubt that opponents of a higher pedestrian/bicycle allocation will portray it as an extravagant concession to a special interest, rather than an investment in infrastructure that is consistent with values that are widely shared in the community. I will do whatever is necessary to craft a careful compromise that moves active transportation modes toward the center of our policy priorities.

CHRIS WIG

I strongly support renewing the Bond Measure to Fix Streets and continuing the work of the Street Repair Review Panel, and I am prepared to campaign vigorously the next time the measure comes to the ballot. I am willing to consider increasing the percentage of funds allocated to bicycle/pedestrian focused projects, especially projects to build sidewalks in places with significant pedestrian traffic. While going door-to-door and talking with residents of Ward 1, I have had many conversations about bike safety, and almost all those conversations were about poor street conditions, for example potholes on West 8th Avenue and West 12th Avenue.

Question 6

In November 2015, the council passed a Vision Zero resolution, saying the city should strive to reduce the number of fatalities and serious injuries on Eugene streets to zero. If you had been on the council at the time, would you have supported this resolution? If you were on the council then, tell us about your vote and your thinking on the resolution. How do you see the city accomplishing this goal? What role would you play?

CHAD ANDERSON

[awaiting response]

KELLY BOYD

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

I would have supported this resolution. I do not see how anyone could be against it! Many people came to Council to express their concerns about safe crossings, particularly for children. Council listened and acted properly. We need to build safer pedestrian crossings, review signage and traffic control, and enforce no texting laws. I will support these ideas and more, including finding funds to implement them.

Joshua Skov

Given that I was one of the people working with and lobbying council to pass this resolution, and pushing Better Eugene-Springfield Transit’s effort to get this done, I can credibly say that I would have voted for the resolution.

More to the point, I think we need a Council that is regularly engaged on Vision Zero – a council that will push staff and the City Manager for more progress, more frequent updates, clearer goals, and more tangible signs of progress.

CHRIS WIG

I support Vision Zero and would have voted in support of the resolution if I had been on council at the time of its passage. In order to accomplish our Vision Zero goals, we need to prioritize bike and pedestrian infrastructure that actually protects bicyclists and pedestrians. This includes bike paths, protected lanes and intersections, and clearly marked crossings. As our next councilor, I will be a reliable advocate for policies that decrease traffic-related injuries and fatalities. For example, I would speak out in favor of common sense adjustments like putting a “no turn on red” sign at the intersection of 11th Avenue and Jefferson Street and making the intersection of 27th Avenue and Lawrence Street a four-way stop.

Question 7

Would you like to list any specific accomplishments in which you helped improve conditions for people who ride bikes, walk or take transit to get around town?

CHAD ANDERSON

[awaiting response]

KELLY BOYD

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

I keep a bag of inexpensive bike lights to give away. I have homeless friends on bikes who do not have lights. This is quite dangerous for them, cars, pedestrians and other bikers. It’s very important to be lit at night whether you are walking, biking or in a car. I will encourage the use of lights, helmets, strong locks, and bike riding/safety classes for kids.

Also, I live on a corner and have a lot of sidewalk to take care of, and I do. Leaves get slippery and ice and snow are worse. All of us can help make walking safer.

Joshua Skov

Honestly, all of the good things that have happened on these fronts have been collective efforts, but I’ll list a few projects to which I have contributed:

  • As a member of the BEST board, I lobbied Council to pass the Vision Zero resolution.
  • As a member of the EmX Steering Committee, I fought hard to keep Vision Zero on the agenda, and ultimately helped persuade several LTD board members to support a board resolution on Vision Zero.
  • I was on the Pedestrian Bicycle Master Plan and gave momentum to the doubling-of-alt-modes goal.
  • I repeatedly advocated for stronger bike/ped policy and more bike/ped funding while a member and then chair of the Sustainability Commission.
  • I advocated for strong goals on alternative modes for their carbon reduction benefit, in the context of the Climate and Energy Action Plan.

CHRIS WIG

As Chair of the Democratic Party of Lane County (DPLC), I have advocated for the following positions excerpted from the 2016 DPLC Platform:

Support reliable and affordable public transportation such as Oregon passenger rail from Eugene to Vancouver and expansion of EmX bus rapid transit system to include electric and hybrid buses.

Support city planning redesigns in Lane County through the Envision Eugene process and the Seven Pillars of Livability considering needs of pedestrians and bicycles, affordable housing, respecting urban growth boundaries and need for agriculture and green spaces.

Question 8

Anything else you want to add on this general topic?

Emily Semple

I lived in Eugene when we took our first steps towards making this a bicycle-friendly city. I know that Council, in the past, has been able to think of creative ways of changing our lifestyle, the way we did then. On this issue, and on many others, Eugene needs to regain its old attitude of creativity and experimentation. This can only be done if the people of Eugene feel that their municipal government represents them and for that to happen, the culture of our city government needs to change.

Joshua Skov

I will be proud to be the first Eugene city councilor …

  • in a household with cargo bikes (an Xtracycle and a Bike Friday).
  • to have participated in all local editions of the Disaster Relief Trials.
  • and to show up at city council meetings consistently by bicycle.

Chris Wig

Thank you for the opportunity to share my positions on public transit and active transportation. As our next councilor, I will be excited to advocate for safer sidewalks, more secure bike storage, enhanced ADA-accessible transportation options and an expanded Bus Rapid Transit system.

2016 mayoral candidates discuss transportation: A WeBikeEugene survey

WeBikeEugene distributed a questionnaire to all five of Eugene’s mayoral candidates. We asked eight questions about transportation issues, particularly active transportation.

Of the five candidates, all but City Councilor Mike Clark, responded.

The candidates’ answers are published below verbatim, without editing except to correct obvious typographical errors. We thank them for their time. (We also surveyed Ward 1 City Council candidates.)

Question 1

Please give us a brief assessment of what you see as the major strengths and deficiencies of Eugene’s transportation system (not so much air or rail, but the system most of use daily to get around town)?

Bob Cassidy

[Bob Cassidy responded to selected questions below, explaining …] I’m going to take a shortcut to this response. I don’t want to be flippant, it’s a time matter — and a basic responsibility matter. The policy decisions come from the councilors. The Mayor has an input only with a tie vote and maybe a little bit in the agenda-setting for the council meetings.

Mike Clark

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

EMX so far a plus. Having 5 bridges specific to bike/pedestrians a huge plus, as is established paths on both sides of the river. Car traffic worse all the time; insanely so on Coburg Road at times. We need smaller buses into outlying areas of town. Need to find a way to fill the buses.

Stefan Strek

The major strength of Eugene’s transportation system is the traditional LTD route system, because it is extremely efficient and adaptable. Routes can be added, re-routed, re-scheduled and otherwise modified easily and efficiently. This has created a wide coverage in Eugene and most of town has some reasonable access to the bus transportation system.

The major deficiency of Eugene’s transportation system is that current officials are bulldozing over local property rights in order to force through the EMX system which is publicly opposed by about 40+ local businesses who are having the opinions of those business owners, employees and customers ignored. That’s not right. Our traditional bus system needs to be valued more and not discredited for a trendy fad which will cost more in the long run.

The EMX is basically a system which runs from the end of Springfield to the Eugene Wal-Mart, it’s publicly opposed by the majority of businesses on its route and the only business who seeks to benefit from this is Wal-Mart, conveniently at the end of the EMX route. Wal-Mart’s pharmacy makes over $2 million each week, presuming the entire rest of the store makes half that, the store makes easily $3 million per week, that’s about $156 million per year that could be going into local businesses which are having their property rights violated instead of their business interests considered. The EMX will result in job loss, decreased property values and a lack of funding for our traditional bus system. Eugene’s traditional bus system has been proven one of the most successful models in the country long before the EMX. The EMX is essentially a lame duck. Eugene citizens aren’t lame ducks, we’re winners, and we’re strongly opposed to the EMX system, what we want is responsible attention to Eugene’s traditional bus system.

Lucy Vinis

Despite our growth and increasing traffic, Eugene is still basically a city in which you can get just about anywhere by car in about 20 minutes — with the exception of a few bottlenecks such as Belt Line and Coburg Road. Many neighborhoods are pleasant and easy to walk; the Ruth Bascom Riverfront Bicycle System is a community treasure; and the increasing number of bike lanes is encouraging. The EmX line along Franklin Boulevard has been a huge success, and I support the concept of improved corridor transit lined with denser development.

As for challenges, our one-way streets, discontinuous sidewalks, and poorly maintained neighborhood streets are all common complaints. For some without access to a car — youth, seniors, those with disabilities, and people of low-income—getting from place to place can be a huge burden, with some trips taking over an hour each way. The hub-and-spoke design of LTD routes makes it time consuming and difficult to travel east and west across town; and many of the busier corridors have infrequent pedestrian crossings. Bike lanes are often confusing and scary – both for the bicyclist and the driver. Finally, the lack of public transportation to the airport is challenging for travelers.

Question 2

If elected, what transportation-related improvements, if any, would you want to make a priority? How would you suggest they be funded?

Bob Cassidy

Personally, I’m a big fan of anything for bikers. All the way from Ruth Bascom to the present. The money allocated for bike transportation issue is inadequate, and that is a budget process that needs changing.

MIKE CLARK

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

I will have to look into this carefully, Certainly, filling the buses is a priority. More bicycle lanes on streets parallel to the busiest streets is ideal for me.

Stefan Strek

It’s a priority to fix the city’s bike lane system so that it’s safer for bikers. Currently, the bike paths have been senselessly re-routed through traffic and across traffic lanes, this is extremely dangerous for bikers. It’s an extremely irresponsible oversight that city management has made. Eugene’s bike fatality rate needs to be better addressed and these irresponsible bike lanes are neglectfully hazardous. Bike lanes should be dedicated to the side of the road, away from traffic. They should be wide enough to be safe, and accessible for all Eugene neighborhoods.

Lucy Vinis

While I’m canvassing, many residents have questions about the priorities for street repair, installation of street calming systems and crosswalks. For many residents, this is the key safety concern and a transparent, consistent and reliable process would help. That should not be a funding need, simply an improvement in access to priorities and accountability that would mean a lot to citizens.

Question 3

The city’s Transportation System Plan, intended to guide transportation policy through 2035, is now in draft form and is expected to go to council for adoption later in 2016 or early 2017. Goals of the plan include a focus on reducing “drive-alone” automobile trips and doubling trips made by transit, bicycling and walking. Do you support these goals; that is, do you see value in encouraging more use of “active modes”? Why or why not? If so, how do you see us achieving those goals?

Bob Cassidy

[did not address this particular question directly]

MIKE CLARK

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

Doubling trips by transit (bus) is a good starting point. Safe routes for bikes and walking needs a lot of work. Twenty-year goals may be needed in some policy; directional momentum important in the short term, which will affect longer term. The importance of people working near their jobs is presently understated.

Stefan Strek

I support these goals. We at the Strek campaign absolutely value transit, bicycling and walking trips as necessary, enjoyable activities that should be safe for Eugene citizens of all ages and backgrounds. We can achieve these goals through reasonable examination which create positive progress. Increasing accessibility is important, I believe we can provide free bus passes for Eugene citizens and pay for this by better managing the city’s current budget. The city’s current budget should be re-prioritized with the citizens’ interests at heart to reduce the money spent on wasteful projects. This will make us have the necessary funds to fix problems as necessary instead of letting them get out of control, such as the poor condition many of Eugene’s roads are in.

Lucy Vinis

I completely support the goal of reducing “drive alone” car trips. People will naturally reduce their car time when other alternatives are comparable or better – and that is contingent on where and how we build housing. The cities that succeed are densely populated with multiple alternatives – frequent buses or walkable distances. I see the value in encouraging active modes and enhancing safety for pedestrians and bicyclists to make it more appealing and feasible, and transitioning to more compact neighborhoods to bring people closer to the places they need to go. We are a community of suburban neighborhoods in which people are still going use their cars to go to the grocery store, but they might take the bus or walk to work, and that is a constructive and feasible goal for planning.

Question 4

What is your primary mode of transportation to and from work? Do you ever use other modes? If not, have you considered other modes, and what has kept you from trying them?

Bob Cassidy

My transportation is walking, a little biking, and cars. I’m 84.

MIKE CLARK

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

I bike, walk and drive on fairly equal level. I live six blocks from work.

Stefan Strek

My main mode of transportation is a cruiser bicycle, and my student fees have always provided me a free bus pass while living here, so I have a thorough knowledge of Eugene’s bus routes. I use the bus when it’s raining a lot and otherwise the beach cruiser bicycle is my main choice. I have a nice Jetta TDI that I use about once a week or less for heavier grocery trips that won’t fit in my bikes basket, or other larger purchases.

Lucy Vinis

I live at the top of Chambers where the closest bus service is mid-way down the hill. This means that I drive a car in order to conduct most of my work and personal errands. That said, we moved to this neighborhood so that our children could walk to the neighborhood school and easily visit their friends on foot and bike. I have never been confident about riding a bike up and down Chambers and cannot juggle the demands of my schedule without the efficiency of a car. This is regrettable, but I don’t see my hill as a transit priority for the city.

Question 5

Eugene’s 2012 pavement bond measure allocates about $8 million a year for five years to resurface and repair city streets. Of that $516,000 annually (about 6 percent) is allocated to support bicycle and pedestrian projects. Will you support a renewal of this bond measure when it expires? Do you think there should be any change in the allocation to bicycle/pedestrian focused projects?

BOB CASSIDY

[did not address this particular question directly]

MIKE CLARK

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

Am not sure what to think about this. Bond measures for many city supported activities could be cropping up soon. Better sidewalks and more bike access on streets where motor vehicles are not overwhelming.

Stefan Strek

I like bonds. We’re a huge fan of bonds at the Strek Campaign. Many of the city’s streets need to be resurfaced and repaved. Many of the city’s bike lanes need to be updated and re-routed. I think the allocation to bicycle/pedestrian projects needs to have more input from local citizens, many of the bicycle/pedestrian projects I see the city set up are wasteful, or even dangerous. One example is the corner of 13th & Willamette where the bike lane crosses through traffic lanes, it’s completely a death-risk to any biker — and an insurance liability for any driver. That’s one of the most trafficked streets in Eugene and should have been planned more responsibly. Coincidentally, there is a white bicycle on that corner as a memorial to Eugene’s bike traffic accident victims. Whoever was in charge of that should have had more consideration, and I’d prioritize bicycle route safety.

Lucy Vinis

I would support the renewal of the bond measure. As for the percentage dedicated to bicycle and pedestrian projects, I would love to see more funds dedicated to sidewalks which are key to many neighborhoods and their discontinuity forces people to step out into the roads. I would also like to see more investment in traffic calming and crossings. Those may be higher priorities for me than more bicycle lanes.

Question 6

In November 2015, the council passed a Vision Zero resolution, saying the city should strive to reduce the number of fatalities and serious injuries on Eugene streets to zero. If you had been on the council at the time, would you have supported this resolution? If you were on the council then, tell us about your vote and your thinking on the resolution. How do you see the city accomplishing this goal? What role would you play?

Bob Cassidy

Vision Zero is a “no brainer”. Would we want a vision of maybe 5, and be satisfied if we only had 4? Obviously the goal should be zero, as is the goal of EWEB for accidents. And they spend enough money to make that happen.

MIKE CLARK

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

Tsunami Books [Landfield’s business] has played a major role in creating a real vision zero between 24th and 29th on Willamette. There has not been a single traffic death of any sort on this stretch in at least the past 18 years, despite 15,000+ vehicles per day on a narrow street. We have helped the street work well with what it is, and will continue doing so using many creative methods of positive engagement and action.

Stefan Strek

The Vision Zero resolution a good resolution. We shouldn’t have people dying in Eugene while they’re simply trying to go out for a bike ride. If I’d been on the council at the time I’d have supported that resolution and would have promoted more responsible planning of bike routes. As I’ve explained, routing bike routes across traffic lanes is an extreme health hazard, it’s death-risk to any Eugene bike commuter and needs to be addressed. Bike routes should be to the side of the road, wide enough to provide a safe buffer zone between bicycles and traffic. It’s a very simple concept to avoid the collision between cars and bicycles that needs to be implemented, whoever decided to route bike routes across traffic lanes needs to lose their job, and I’m giving them a bad job reference on the way out. I’d tell them, “You’re fired!” and hire someone who actually cares about Eugene’s people.

Lucy Vinis

I absolutely support Vision Zero and would have voted for it had I been on the council. As I wrote above, I would like to see us improve our sidewalks, street crossings and traffic calming in order to make it safer for people to walk. I would like to improve the transparency, accountability and process for prioritizing these repairs.

Question 7

Would you like to list any specific accomplishments in which you helped improve conditions for people who ride bikes, walk or take transit to get around town?

BOB CASSIDY

[did not address this particular question directly]

MIKE CLARK

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

Two years ago I personally took the lead in fixing a very serious bicycle access design flaw built at 24th and Amazon Parkway, this after I suffered a near-death injury on the city’s new, flawed access.

Stefan Strek

I regularly use transit and practice good etiquette. I give up my seat for the elderly, women with children, or disabled people every time. Think globally, act locally.

Lucy Vinis

I represented the interests of environmental organizations for 17 years as the Eugene campaign manager for EarthShare Oregon. Our members included Bicycle Transportation Alliance, 1000 Friends of Oregon and others who were focused on land use and livability. My role was to engage employers and employees in private and public workplaces to understand and support the work of the EarthShare member organizations. In my time with EarthShare, the Eugene campaign grew from two participating workplaces to 20, and included some of the highest dollar support for environmental work in our statewide annual campaign.

Question 8

Anything else you want to add on this general topic?

Scott Landfield

Soon after I first arrived in Eugene, I was told it was the #1 town for biking in America. It certainly is not now. I will work toward it being the very best it can be in the near-term and long term.

Stefan Strek

Eugene’s a great city to live in largely because of Eugene’s connections, between people, and these exist because of active transportation routes which are used by people who think positively about Eugene culture. Many cities do not have access to parks and public space as Eugene does. We’re at a crossroads between using incoming resources responsibly to reinforce Eugene’s progressive, free-thinking, independent, local-business loving culture — or we can let out of town influence continue to dominate Eugene politics and Eugene policy. I am the only candidate who has mentioned helping animals in addition to people, and I have always cared about the environment as something that’s alive the same as any animal. Together, we can do more than “Make Eugene Great Again.” I think we have access to, “A Better Eugene.” We can have a clean town that’s fun to live in.

Currently, the major detraction for Eugene’s culture is the prevalence of bike-theft and property crime. The “Kryptonite” lock company produces fine locks internationally, and their locks are uninsured for theft everywhere except two cities: New York City and Eugene, Oregon. True story, almost everyone who bikes in Eugene has had their bike stolen. Many residents have had several bikes worth over a thousand dollars stolen or stripped for parts without any investigation from the police, because it’s such an extreme problem that’s been ignored by local authorities and de-prioritized by the current administration.

Our police officers are hard-working people who need more help reorganizing administrative priorities so that local officers on the ground are able to respond and protect local citizens from crime. My plan to eliminate bike theft in Eugene is to introduce mandatory minimum community service sentences for all bike-related theft and strictly enforce them, to provide much needed maintenance for Eugene’s roads and parkland. Through community service, these people who otherwise would victimize the community will learn self-discipline, self-respect, and earn the sense of accomplishment that comes with helping the community — and the rest of us will lose less parts off our bikes, the parks will be cleaner, and the roads will be better maintained so we’ll all be able to live in a more positive Eugene.

Job Opportunity: Skilled and Upbeat Bike Mechanic

Arriving By Bike™ is accepting applications for an enthusiastic professional mechanic. Our mission is to support and serve people who use bikes for transportation in their daily lives.

Mechanics assess bikes, discuss needs and options, and service and build bikes. Also work cohesively with staff to make our shop hum: provide superior customer service, find solutions and gear to fill cyclists’ needs, stock merchandise, and maintain a clean and organized store.

Ideal candidate: uses a bicycle for daily transportation, has touring experience, excellent with beginners, families, and experienced cyclists, and has prior training or employment in bicycle industry. Desired skills also include working on the latest transportation equipment: city, touring, and cargo bikes, dynamo lighting, electric assist, and accessory installation.

25 – 40 hours, can include weekends. Contact employment@arrivingbybike.com or stop by the shop at 2705 Willamette Street to pick-up an application.

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LiveMove Speaker Series: Building Advocacy Movements with Lori Kessler Gratl

Join the LiveMove Speaker Series for another interesting speaker this Friday, April 29th 7:30-9:00pm at Bicycle Way of Life (556 Charnelton St.). Free event sponsored by LiveMove, OTREC, SCI, and Bicycle Way of Life. Free food courtesy of the Tap and Growler.

Lori Kessler Gratl is an architect, enthusiastic cyclist and member of the board of directors of Vancouver, BC, based advocacy group HUB. She bikes to work daily, loves long-distance touring, and is a performing member of the B:C:Clettes. Lori will speak about how to build and sustain an advocacy movement and demonstrate some of the successes of HUB’s bicycle advocacy in Vancouver, BC.

Join the Facebook event and spread the word.

LiveMove April2016 Speaker

Job Postings- Bike Friday, City of Eugene, Trips for Kids

Job Postings for Bike Friday

  • Customer Service bike mechanic and parts puller (Full Time)
  • Purchasing agent (Full Time)
  • Reception and showroom greater for the summer (Part time for the season)

For details about these positions see the Bike Friday job posting website.

Bike Friday Eugene, Oregon on Wednesday, March 26, 2014.  Meg Roussos/Bloomberg

Bike Friday Eugene, Oregon on Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Meg Roussos/Bloomberg

City of Eugene Park Ambassador Position Open

Would you or someone you know be interested in working along Eugene’s riverfront park system primarily by bike this summer to enrich the experience of park patrons? The City of Eugene Parks and Open Space Division has two openings in their park ambassador program. The program runs from mid-May through mid-September. Apply by May 2.  Good people skills a must.
Craigslist ad with more information here

Park.Ambassadors

Youth Mountain Bike Group Leader
Trips for Kids-CAT (TFK-CAT) is seeking a new leader for our youth outdoor organization.
Roles & responsibilities include leading youth mountain bike trips (can include camping), administration, volunteer coordination, public relations/marketing, etc.
Eligible candidates will have good organization skills, bicycle riding skills, and communication skills. An appreciation for the outdoors and a firm belief that youth need to spend more time enjoying the natural world that surrounds us are a must.
TFK-CAT’s current leader will continue to support the organization including being available to train the new leader. This is a volunteer position. Send cover-letter & resume to trips4kids (at) catoregon (dot) org.

 

Travel Lane County Pedals Across State

Story via Register Guard Outdoors

Travel Lane County will embark Sunday on a six-day 360-mile cycling tour across the state, joined by destination marketing organizations, cycling enthusiasts and Scenic Bikeway Proponents.

The tour will begin at the Eugene, Cascades & Coast Adventure Center in Springfield at 8:30 a.m. Sunday (April 17) and will culminate at the Oregon Governor’s Conference on Tourism in Pendleton on April 22.

The cyclists will traverse parts of five Oregon Scenic Bikeways — McKenzie Pass, Sisters to Smith Rock, Madras Mountain Views, Painted Hills and Blue Mountain Century. Riders will end each day with celebrations in Rainbow (6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday), Sisters, Madras, Fossil and Heppner.

Cyclists are invited to join the ride on its first leg to the McKenzie Outdoor Center in Rainbow. Also joining the ride will be Travel Lane County’s mobile visitor center, MIKE the Bike (a Haul-a-Day cargo bike built locally by Bike Friday). The tour can be followed by using #TourDeMIKE and #ORGC tags on Twitter and Instagram.

Mike The Bike

Also on a related Lane County Cycling Note:

Organizers gear up for Tour de Lane

Cyclists have until Friday to take advantage of early registration for the Tour de Lane, a three-day cycling event and rally to be held Aug. 5-7 at Richardson Park at Fern Ridge Lake.

Those who register early can save $10 off the $195 fee. Cost includes choice of supported rides; snacks and beverages at rest stops; route maps; SAG wagon; mechanical support; dinner for all riders Saturday evening with door prizes; sponsored beer and wine garden nightly; shuttles to Amazon Park for Sunday rides and activities during the Blackberry bRamble as well as bRamble registration fees.

For more information and to register, visit www.tourdelane.com.

Speaker Tonight: Peter Norton, Author of “Fighting Traffic”

Fighting TrafficJoin the LiveMove student group tonight, Friday April 8th, at the LCC Downtown Center (Room 112) to hear from guest speaker Peter Norton. He is a historian of engineering and society, with particular interests in streets and people. He is an associate professor in the Department of Engineering and Society at the University of Virginia, where he has taught since 1998. He is the author of Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City (MIT Press, 2008). Peter will speak on Fighting Traffic and how to create streets that work for everyone. Free snacks.

Tree Planting By Bike

Tree Planting by Bike3It’s bike planting season again with Friends of Trees! In partnership with REI and many volunteers they are building their plant-by-bike program and they could use your human powered skills! Over the past few years the program has had several of these ‘bike crew’ plantings and they are a very fun way to show the power of bikes AND get more trees planted in Eugene; creating a more livable and greener city.

There are two tree plantings left this season; April 2nd and 23rd. Sign-up here, gather your trailers, cargo bikes, or just your regular bikes (to assist cargo bikes) then arrive at 8:30 – 8:45 am to be registered to a bike crew. Grab coffee and breakfast treats, and then help load trees and tools onto bike trailers — and tally ho — you’re off to plant trees by bike. Help show the power of bikes to do work and spread shade and beauty around Eugene!

Tree Planting by Bike

 

bikeguy

Sign-up to plant & ride