City of Eugene Seeks New Members for Active Transportation Committee

The City of Eugene seeks residents who are interested in serving on the Active Transportation Committee (ATC), formerly Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee.  Recruitment is underway to fill vacancies for two year terms beginning January 2017.  Applicants must reside within Eugene’s Urban Growth Boundary and willing to attend monthly meetings and read background materials provided by city staff.  Additional meetings may be scheduled as needed.

The purpose of the ATC is: (1) to advise the City of Eugene staff and community organizations and partners on implementation of Eugene’s Pedestrian and Bicycle Strategic Plan; (2) to represent community and constituent interests in transportation planning decisions; and, (3) to provide feedback to staff on projects relating to walking and bicycling.

ATC members play a vital role in implementing walking and biking projects in the Transportation System Plan which will shape the future of the pedestrian and bicycling system for the next 20 years and make Eugene an even greater place for people who walk and bicycle.

Applications are available online via the City of Eugene website at http://www.eugene-or.gov/490/Committees, by e-mail at lee.shoemaker@ci.eugene.or.us, or by picking up an application at City of Eugene Engineering, 99 E. Broadway, Suite 400, Eugene.

The deadline for submitting applications is November 25, 2016.   

For more information, contact Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator Lee Shoemaker at 682-5471 or lee.shoemaker@ci.eugene.or.us.

Current BPAC Members

Tree Plantings By Bike

Via Friends of Trees:
TreeBikeIf you are pumped on biking and want to bring your bike out to a planting event – we would love that! Bicycling crews transport all of the trees, tools and people to each planting site during neighborhood planting events. Folks with bike trailers and racks are encouraged, though anyone with a bike is welcome to plant with us!

Friends of Trees provides trained planting guidance as well as a thoughtful planting route that won’t take you up steep hills, along busy highways, nor terribly long distances with your heavy loads of trees and tools. After every planting, we invite you to warm up at our potluck lunch with tasty soups and other homemade treats.

Last year we had a bike team at every planting and this year we plan on having two! I am here to invite you all, to bask in the awesomeness of pedal-powered tree-planting with Friends of Trees! With our first bike event taking place one month from now in November, I wanted to make sure you all got our schedule of events sooner than later.
Trailers, bungees, panniers, oh my! Bike planters always are an awesome scene, come planting morning.
If you have friends who may want to join you by bike this season – please invite them and send them the sign-up link! We are hoping to have more planting teams this season than ever before. The more bikes and trailers that show up, the better!

Friends of Trees Plant It!Please reach out to us if you have any questions about biking at our events, or volunteering with Friends of Trees in general. You may reach us at Eugenetrees@FriendsofTrees.org or 541-632-3683.

See our bike planting dates and sign up, click there –> Bike Planter Sign Up Form

bike-planting

Huge Crane to Lift New Bike-Ped Bridge Into Place

What- A 100-foot crane will hoist a prefabricated 90-foot bridge deck onto the support structure for a new bicycle-pedestrian bridge over Amazon Creek. Images from a prior lift are attached for reference.

Background- LTD is building two new bicycle-pedestrian bridges this year as part of the West Eugene EmX project. The bridges, plus a third bridge to be built next year by the City of Eugene, are funded through a $2.9 million ConnectOregon V grant. This investment will allow residents who live south of Amazon Creek to easily connect to West 11thAvenue businesses and the West Eugene EmX service that will launch next fall. The bridges also enhance Fern Ridge Path and the rest of the path system for recreational walking and bicycling.

When– Thursday, October 27, 2016. Be in position by 12:00 p.m. (Noon). The crane lift is expected to occur between 12:15 p.m. and 12:30 p.m.

Where- Just West of Acorn Park on the Fern Ridge Path. If driving you may park along the street on Buck Street or West 13th Avenue.

ltd-bikebridge-map

Knickerbocker Bridge Closure

The City of Eugene posted the following road construction advisory:

South Bank Path (Knickerbocker Bridge to Walnut Street): The South Bank Path is closed for construction between Walnut Street and Knickerbocker Bridge until mid-November. Path users should travel on the North Bank Path and the Autzen Bridge. The old path is being replaced with new concrete and will be slightly realigned. The Knickerbocker Bridge will receive new railing.

South Willamette bike lane striping delayed until June

The re-striping of south Willamette Street, which will add bike lanes from 24th to 29th avenues, has been delayed for a few weeks.

Crews have marked out the new configuration of the street, and the actual re-striping was expected in the next week or so.

Spray-painted white markings show where the new pavement striping will go.

Spray-painted white markings show where the new pavement striping will go.

But the contractor hired to do the striping had a conflict and is not available for few weeks, City of Eugene Transportation Planning Engineer Chris Henry told a meeting Thursday of the Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Committee. The striping should be completed by mid-June, Henry said.

Ward 1 City Council candidates on transportation: A WeBikeEugene survey

WeBikeEugene distributed a questionnaire to all five candidates running to fill the City Council seat of outgoing Councilor George Brown in Eugene’s Ward 1.

We asked eight questions about transportation issues, particularly active transportation (same questions we posed earlier to the mayoral candidates).

Of the five Ward 1 candidates, three answered the questions: Emily Semple, Joshua Skov and Chris Wig. (Chad Anderson and Kelly Boyd have not responded.)

The candidates’ answers are published below verbatim, without editing except to correct obvious typographical errors. We thank them for their time.

Question 1

Please give us a brief assessment of what you see as the major strengths and deficiencies of Eugene’s transportation system (not so much air or rail, but the system most of use daily to get around town)?

Chad Anderson

[awaiting response]

Kelly Boyd

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

Like most cities in America, Eugene seems to rely on those modes of transportation that leave the heaviest carbon footprint: cars, trucks and (non-electric) buses. We need to improve the ease, attractiveness, and safety of walking and biking, as well as improving the efficiency of mass transit in order to decrease carbon emissions.

I am glad we have our buses but we have lost many routes and frequency of buses. We need to replace and add to routes and schedules so more people will find buses convenient to use. This is especially a problem on Sundays. We are moving toward more and more electric buses to lessen air pollution and this is a trend we need to continue.

I use our bike paths and lanes and would not ride my bike nearly as much without them. It is good to see them well-used and we need more. I would like to see more off road or buffered bike lanes which are safer, especially for children.

We have a huge problem with bicycle theft in this town. We need more secure places to lock bikes. I will also encourage etching id on bikes. A shared bicycle program would be wonderful, allowing many more people to use biking for transportation without the upfront cost of a bike.

Joshua Skov

We have many strengths:

  • Many walkable neighborhoods.
  • A tremendous system of bicycle lanes and paths, especially for recreation.
  • Not a lot of car traffic.
  • A transit system that is one of the best in the country for a community of our scale.
  • Culture – a driver culture of tolerance and care toward alternative modes (compared to other places), and a vibrant bicycle culture.
  • A policy commitment to Vision Zero by the City and the transit district.

At the same time, we have some deficiencies:

  • Many neighborhoods lack complete sidewalk networks, or even safe non-sidewalk routes.
  • Our bicycle network is patchy, with some big missing elements.
  • A too-slow pace of funding strategic pedestrian/bike investments, and little institutional flexibility for funding investments to accompany our narrowly defined pavement preservation program.
  • Little coherence regarding the implementation of Vision Zero.
  • A focus on parking that fails to acknowledge the legacy of too-high parking requirements in other communities, technological change (e.g., such as the possibility of autonomous ridesharing vehicles), shifts in preferences among millennials (away from the car), the high cost of providing so much parking.

CHRIS WIG

I believe major strengths of Eugene’s transportation system include establishing Bus Rapid Transit as the backbone of our transit system, following through on our commitment to make public transportation more environmentally friendly by purchasing more electric buses and empowering citizens to get involved in creating the transit system of the future (e.g. Eugene Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee, MovingAhead Sounding Board, etc.).

One of our greatest transportation infrastructure challenges is the lack of protected bike lanes and a shortage of well-maintained sidewalks. In order to convince everyday people to utilize environmentally friendly modes of transportation we must first convince them that active modes of transportation are safe. We must also continue to replace our old diesel buses with new electric buses to reduce the carbon footprint of our transit network.

Question 2

If elected, what transportation-related improvements, if any, would you want to make a priority? How would you suggest they be funded?

CHAD ANDERSON

[awaiting response]

KELLY BOYD

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

I would like to see us investigate free buses. Corvallis does this so we could look at their model. I realize this will take time and cooperation with Lane County, state and federal governments as well as creative funding.

However, free buses would allow many people to not need or use cars, dramatically reducing carbon emissions in accordance with our Climate Protection Ordinance.

Joshua Skov

Two thoughts.

First, apart from specific improvements, I will simply bring a different tone and attitude to Council, when it comes to pedestrian and bicycle investments. I viscerally understand the situation of people on foot and on bike, and I will represent them. Furthermore, I understand the connections between active modes and our high-level policy objectives and broadly held community values – on climate change, health, safety for physically vulnerable populations, and affordability for working families and especially low-income households.

Second, here’s a quick list, though I am sure these will change over time:

  • Fully funded Pedestrian Bicycle Master Plan: I will push for a schedule of full funding of the Pedestrian Bicycle Master Plan projects on a reasonable timeframe, perhaps 20 years or less. I think these investments should be funded at least in part through the pavement preservation bond measure (see #5 below) and the existing gas tax, though I will look for other funding as well. Other communities (e.g. Portland) have tried additional gas taxes, for example.
  • Explicit support and funding for innovation: We know that we don’t yet have all of the necessary tools in our infrastructure toolbox, so we need to empower City staff to seek designs and innovations from elsewhere – and implement them here. Just as we have learned from the Alder cycle track, we will learn from other innovation. (I keep looking for a candidate for the protected intersection!).
  • More Sunday Streets: Our two annual Sunday Streets celebrations have been wildly popular (4,000 people downtown, 3,500 in the Friendly), and they represent a way to transform local culture to be more open to walking and biking. They also don’t cost the City very much. We should find cultural program funding and outside sponsorship opportunities to make many more of them happen, perhaps eight to 10 per summer.
  • More Complete Safe Routes to School Integration: We already have a potent Safe Routes to School program, but it should have more influence in City investments so we can ensure that all children have safe non-motorized routes to school. This goal should inform our prioritization of bond money (again, see #5).

CHRIS WIG

I strongly support the expansion of the EmX along Highway 99, Coburg Road and River Road/30th Ave. Improving public transit on corridors targeted by the MovingAhead project will provide safe, accessible and environmentally friendly transportation for neighborhoods that are currently underserved by these services. This extension is essential to helping Eugene reduce its carbon footprint and to serve as a model for other mid-size communities to follow our lead.

I also believe the city should install a significant quantity of secure bike storage lockers downtown to protect and encourage active transportation and work with the Eugene Police Department to create a bike theft task force.

Question 3

The city’s Transportation System Plan, intended to guide transportation policy through 2035, is now in draft form and is expected to go to council for adoption later in 2016 or early 2017. Goals of the plan include a focus on reducing “drive-alone” automobile trips and doubling trips made by transit, bicycling and walking. Do you support these goals; that is, do you see value in encouraging more use of “active modes”? Why or why not? If so, how do you see us achieving those goals?

CHAD ANDERSON

[awaiting response]

KELLY BOYD

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

I absolutely support these goals. More active modes of transportation have many benefits: less carbon output, less wear on roads, more exercise resulting in better physical and mental health, more connection with nature and the outdoors, and a better feeling of community with a slower pace and interaction with other walkers and riders.

Safer and more bike paths and sidewalks will draw more people to biking and walking.

More free parking lots near outer bus terminals could reduce drive-alone trips. People would drive shorter distances from home to the parking lots rather than all the way to their destinations.

Joshua Skov

I completely support these goals, just as I pushed for them when I was on the Pedestrian Bicycle Master Plan Citizens Advisory Committee. I see tremendous value – economic, social, health, environmental – in fostering this modal shift.

We will achieve this goals by fostering the right culture and building the right infrastructure. As a city councilor, I will do both. First, I look forward to being a conspicuous pedestrian and bicyclist as an elected official, and a supporter of the huge amount of good work being done by so many people in the community. Second, I will advocate for building out the system we should already have, such as the one described in the Pedestrian Bicycle Master Plan.

CHRIS WIG

I support setting goals to reduce automobile trips and substantially increase the number of community members who choose to use active transportation. Achieving these goals is an essential component to reducing carbon pollution and meeting the benchmarks established in the Climate Recovery Ordinance.

We can accomplish these objectives by supporting compact urban development as our city grows and by making it safer and easier to bike or walk. As we grow, we must remain mindful of who could be left out when we limit the discussion to prioritizing active transportation alone: seniors and other people with mobility challenges. We need to ensure our transportation infrastructure is ADA accessible, not just “accessible.”

Question 4

What is your primary mode of transportation to and from work? Do you ever use other modes? If not, have you considered other modes, and what has kept you from trying them?

CHAD ANDERSON

[awaiting response]

KELLY BOYD

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

I have lived in downtown Eugene for thirty years and started my graphic design business, Semple Design, 15 years ago. For all that time, I have been lucky enough to work at home or have an easy walk to my office.

In the summer, I often ride my bike but my primary mode of transportation is walking. I only use my car when I need to purchase something I cannot carry or from a distant store.

Joshua Skov

Our household (the relevant unit of analysis here, as we are a family of four) is split mainly between biking and driving. We have one car, used primarily for shuttling kids to activities in bad weather or at considerable distances; otherwise, we bike to work and school whenever circumstances permit. Also, the parent without the car (usually me!) commutes by bike.

We use the bus, but rarely, but only because the car and the bicycle are typically more convenient and faster. At times in the past, when the routes and our needs have matched up well, we have been regular bus users.

I believe my regular use of the bicycle makes me empathize better than I would otherwise with people who rely on walking, bicycling, and transit. It also gives me insights into those needs. I will bring that empathy and insight to council decision making.

CHRIS WIG

I walk or drive to work depending on whether or not I will be working at more than one office throughout the day, the location of any responsibilities I may have after work and the weather. I am excited for the completion of the West Eugene EmX line, and for the first time since I graduated from college I am considering using public transit as my primary mode of transportation to work.

Question 5

Eugene’s 2012 pavement bond measure allocates about $8 million a year for five years to resurface and repair city streets. Of that $516,000 annually (about 6 percent) is allocated to support bicycle and pedestrian projects. Will you support a renewal of this bond measure when it expires? Do you think there should be any change in the allocation to bicycle/pedestrian focused projects?

CHAD ANDERSON

[awaiting response]

KELLY BOYD

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

I will support a renewal of the pavement bond measure. I believe the portion of non-road money should be increased to be used for sidewalk repair, safer street crossings, and more bicycle lanes. With more walking and biking, there will be less wear and tear on our roads allowing us to spend less money maintaining our streets.

Joshua Skov

I will absolutely support the bond measure next time around, as we have a tremendous backlog of transportation system repairs that are desperately necessary. The measure was popular (passing with over 60 percent of the vote), which demonstrates that people understand the need and are willing to pay for it.

I’m hoping we have a change in allocation and approach with the next bond measure. First, given the centrality of pedestrian and bicycle modes to major policy objectives – land use, climate action, and health, to name a few – we need councilors who are willing to push staff and members of the Street Repair Review Panel (SRRP) to more fully support a build-out of bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure.

That said, I am cognizant of the political danger of this allocation. I have no doubt that opponents of a higher pedestrian/bicycle allocation will portray it as an extravagant concession to a special interest, rather than an investment in infrastructure that is consistent with values that are widely shared in the community. I will do whatever is necessary to craft a careful compromise that moves active transportation modes toward the center of our policy priorities.

CHRIS WIG

I strongly support renewing the Bond Measure to Fix Streets and continuing the work of the Street Repair Review Panel, and I am prepared to campaign vigorously the next time the measure comes to the ballot. I am willing to consider increasing the percentage of funds allocated to bicycle/pedestrian focused projects, especially projects to build sidewalks in places with significant pedestrian traffic. While going door-to-door and talking with residents of Ward 1, I have had many conversations about bike safety, and almost all those conversations were about poor street conditions, for example potholes on West 8th Avenue and West 12th Avenue.

Question 6

In November 2015, the council passed a Vision Zero resolution, saying the city should strive to reduce the number of fatalities and serious injuries on Eugene streets to zero. If you had been on the council at the time, would you have supported this resolution? If you were on the council then, tell us about your vote and your thinking on the resolution. How do you see the city accomplishing this goal? What role would you play?

CHAD ANDERSON

[awaiting response]

KELLY BOYD

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

I would have supported this resolution. I do not see how anyone could be against it! Many people came to Council to express their concerns about safe crossings, particularly for children. Council listened and acted properly. We need to build safer pedestrian crossings, review signage and traffic control, and enforce no texting laws. I will support these ideas and more, including finding funds to implement them.

Joshua Skov

Given that I was one of the people working with and lobbying council to pass this resolution, and pushing Better Eugene-Springfield Transit’s effort to get this done, I can credibly say that I would have voted for the resolution.

More to the point, I think we need a Council that is regularly engaged on Vision Zero – a council that will push staff and the City Manager for more progress, more frequent updates, clearer goals, and more tangible signs of progress.

CHRIS WIG

I support Vision Zero and would have voted in support of the resolution if I had been on council at the time of its passage. In order to accomplish our Vision Zero goals, we need to prioritize bike and pedestrian infrastructure that actually protects bicyclists and pedestrians. This includes bike paths, protected lanes and intersections, and clearly marked crossings. As our next councilor, I will be a reliable advocate for policies that decrease traffic-related injuries and fatalities. For example, I would speak out in favor of common sense adjustments like putting a “no turn on red” sign at the intersection of 11th Avenue and Jefferson Street and making the intersection of 27th Avenue and Lawrence Street a four-way stop.

Question 7

Would you like to list any specific accomplishments in which you helped improve conditions for people who ride bikes, walk or take transit to get around town?

CHAD ANDERSON

[awaiting response]

KELLY BOYD

[awaiting response]

Emily Semple

I keep a bag of inexpensive bike lights to give away. I have homeless friends on bikes who do not have lights. This is quite dangerous for them, cars, pedestrians and other bikers. It’s very important to be lit at night whether you are walking, biking or in a car. I will encourage the use of lights, helmets, strong locks, and bike riding/safety classes for kids.

Also, I live on a corner and have a lot of sidewalk to take care of, and I do. Leaves get slippery and ice and snow are worse. All of us can help make walking safer.

Joshua Skov

Honestly, all of the good things that have happened on these fronts have been collective efforts, but I’ll list a few projects to which I have contributed:

  • As a member of the BEST board, I lobbied Council to pass the Vision Zero resolution.
  • As a member of the EmX Steering Committee, I fought hard to keep Vision Zero on the agenda, and ultimately helped persuade several LTD board members to support a board resolution on Vision Zero.
  • I was on the Pedestrian Bicycle Master Plan and gave momentum to the doubling-of-alt-modes goal.
  • I repeatedly advocated for stronger bike/ped policy and more bike/ped funding while a member and then chair of the Sustainability Commission.
  • I advocated for strong goals on alternative modes for their carbon reduction benefit, in the context of the Climate and Energy Action Plan.

CHRIS WIG

As Chair of the Democratic Party of Lane County (DPLC), I have advocated for the following positions excerpted from the 2016 DPLC Platform:

Support reliable and affordable public transportation such as Oregon passenger rail from Eugene to Vancouver and expansion of EmX bus rapid transit system to include electric and hybrid buses.

Support city planning redesigns in Lane County through the Envision Eugene process and the Seven Pillars of Livability considering needs of pedestrians and bicycles, affordable housing, respecting urban growth boundaries and need for agriculture and green spaces.

Question 8

Anything else you want to add on this general topic?

Emily Semple

I lived in Eugene when we took our first steps towards making this a bicycle-friendly city. I know that Council, in the past, has been able to think of creative ways of changing our lifestyle, the way we did then. On this issue, and on many others, Eugene needs to regain its old attitude of creativity and experimentation. This can only be done if the people of Eugene feel that their municipal government represents them and for that to happen, the culture of our city government needs to change.

Joshua Skov

I will be proud to be the first Eugene city councilor …

  • in a household with cargo bikes (an Xtracycle and a Bike Friday).
  • to have participated in all local editions of the Disaster Relief Trials.
  • and to show up at city council meetings consistently by bicycle.

Chris Wig

Thank you for the opportunity to share my positions on public transit and active transportation. As our next councilor, I will be excited to advocate for safer sidewalks, more secure bike storage, enhanced ADA-accessible transportation options and an expanded Bus Rapid Transit system.

2016 mayoral candidates discuss transportation: A WeBikeEugene survey

WeBikeEugene distributed a questionnaire to all five of Eugene’s mayoral candidates. We asked eight questions about transportation issues, particularly active transportation.

Of the five candidates, all but City Councilor Mike Clark, responded.

The candidates’ answers are published below verbatim, without editing except to correct obvious typographical errors. We thank them for their time. (We also surveyed Ward 1 City Council candidates.)

Question 1

Please give us a brief assessment of what you see as the major strengths and deficiencies of Eugene’s transportation system (not so much air or rail, but the system most of use daily to get around town)?

Bob Cassidy

[Bob Cassidy responded to selected questions below, explaining …] I’m going to take a shortcut to this response. I don’t want to be flippant, it’s a time matter — and a basic responsibility matter. The policy decisions come from the councilors. The Mayor has an input only with a tie vote and maybe a little bit in the agenda-setting for the council meetings.

Mike Clark

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

EMX so far a plus. Having 5 bridges specific to bike/pedestrians a huge plus, as is established paths on both sides of the river. Car traffic worse all the time; insanely so on Coburg Road at times. We need smaller buses into outlying areas of town. Need to find a way to fill the buses.

Stefan Strek

The major strength of Eugene’s transportation system is the traditional LTD route system, because it is extremely efficient and adaptable. Routes can be added, re-routed, re-scheduled and otherwise modified easily and efficiently. This has created a wide coverage in Eugene and most of town has some reasonable access to the bus transportation system.

The major deficiency of Eugene’s transportation system is that current officials are bulldozing over local property rights in order to force through the EMX system which is publicly opposed by about 40+ local businesses who are having the opinions of those business owners, employees and customers ignored. That’s not right. Our traditional bus system needs to be valued more and not discredited for a trendy fad which will cost more in the long run.

The EMX is basically a system which runs from the end of Springfield to the Eugene Wal-Mart, it’s publicly opposed by the majority of businesses on its route and the only business who seeks to benefit from this is Wal-Mart, conveniently at the end of the EMX route. Wal-Mart’s pharmacy makes over $2 million each week, presuming the entire rest of the store makes half that, the store makes easily $3 million per week, that’s about $156 million per year that could be going into local businesses which are having their property rights violated instead of their business interests considered. The EMX will result in job loss, decreased property values and a lack of funding for our traditional bus system. Eugene’s traditional bus system has been proven one of the most successful models in the country long before the EMX. The EMX is essentially a lame duck. Eugene citizens aren’t lame ducks, we’re winners, and we’re strongly opposed to the EMX system, what we want is responsible attention to Eugene’s traditional bus system.

Lucy Vinis

Despite our growth and increasing traffic, Eugene is still basically a city in which you can get just about anywhere by car in about 20 minutes — with the exception of a few bottlenecks such as Belt Line and Coburg Road. Many neighborhoods are pleasant and easy to walk; the Ruth Bascom Riverfront Bicycle System is a community treasure; and the increasing number of bike lanes is encouraging. The EmX line along Franklin Boulevard has been a huge success, and I support the concept of improved corridor transit lined with denser development.

As for challenges, our one-way streets, discontinuous sidewalks, and poorly maintained neighborhood streets are all common complaints. For some without access to a car — youth, seniors, those with disabilities, and people of low-income—getting from place to place can be a huge burden, with some trips taking over an hour each way. The hub-and-spoke design of LTD routes makes it time consuming and difficult to travel east and west across town; and many of the busier corridors have infrequent pedestrian crossings. Bike lanes are often confusing and scary – both for the bicyclist and the driver. Finally, the lack of public transportation to the airport is challenging for travelers.

Question 2

If elected, what transportation-related improvements, if any, would you want to make a priority? How would you suggest they be funded?

Bob Cassidy

Personally, I’m a big fan of anything for bikers. All the way from Ruth Bascom to the present. The money allocated for bike transportation issue is inadequate, and that is a budget process that needs changing.

MIKE CLARK

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

I will have to look into this carefully, Certainly, filling the buses is a priority. More bicycle lanes on streets parallel to the busiest streets is ideal for me.

Stefan Strek

It’s a priority to fix the city’s bike lane system so that it’s safer for bikers. Currently, the bike paths have been senselessly re-routed through traffic and across traffic lanes, this is extremely dangerous for bikers. It’s an extremely irresponsible oversight that city management has made. Eugene’s bike fatality rate needs to be better addressed and these irresponsible bike lanes are neglectfully hazardous. Bike lanes should be dedicated to the side of the road, away from traffic. They should be wide enough to be safe, and accessible for all Eugene neighborhoods.

Lucy Vinis

While I’m canvassing, many residents have questions about the priorities for street repair, installation of street calming systems and crosswalks. For many residents, this is the key safety concern and a transparent, consistent and reliable process would help. That should not be a funding need, simply an improvement in access to priorities and accountability that would mean a lot to citizens.

Question 3

The city’s Transportation System Plan, intended to guide transportation policy through 2035, is now in draft form and is expected to go to council for adoption later in 2016 or early 2017. Goals of the plan include a focus on reducing “drive-alone” automobile trips and doubling trips made by transit, bicycling and walking. Do you support these goals; that is, do you see value in encouraging more use of “active modes”? Why or why not? If so, how do you see us achieving those goals?

Bob Cassidy

[did not address this particular question directly]

MIKE CLARK

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

Doubling trips by transit (bus) is a good starting point. Safe routes for bikes and walking needs a lot of work. Twenty-year goals may be needed in some policy; directional momentum important in the short term, which will affect longer term. The importance of people working near their jobs is presently understated.

Stefan Strek

I support these goals. We at the Strek campaign absolutely value transit, bicycling and walking trips as necessary, enjoyable activities that should be safe for Eugene citizens of all ages and backgrounds. We can achieve these goals through reasonable examination which create positive progress. Increasing accessibility is important, I believe we can provide free bus passes for Eugene citizens and pay for this by better managing the city’s current budget. The city’s current budget should be re-prioritized with the citizens’ interests at heart to reduce the money spent on wasteful projects. This will make us have the necessary funds to fix problems as necessary instead of letting them get out of control, such as the poor condition many of Eugene’s roads are in.

Lucy Vinis

I completely support the goal of reducing “drive alone” car trips. People will naturally reduce their car time when other alternatives are comparable or better – and that is contingent on where and how we build housing. The cities that succeed are densely populated with multiple alternatives – frequent buses or walkable distances. I see the value in encouraging active modes and enhancing safety for pedestrians and bicyclists to make it more appealing and feasible, and transitioning to more compact neighborhoods to bring people closer to the places they need to go. We are a community of suburban neighborhoods in which people are still going use their cars to go to the grocery store, but they might take the bus or walk to work, and that is a constructive and feasible goal for planning.

Question 4

What is your primary mode of transportation to and from work? Do you ever use other modes? If not, have you considered other modes, and what has kept you from trying them?

Bob Cassidy

My transportation is walking, a little biking, and cars. I’m 84.

MIKE CLARK

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

I bike, walk and drive on fairly equal level. I live six blocks from work.

Stefan Strek

My main mode of transportation is a cruiser bicycle, and my student fees have always provided me a free bus pass while living here, so I have a thorough knowledge of Eugene’s bus routes. I use the bus when it’s raining a lot and otherwise the beach cruiser bicycle is my main choice. I have a nice Jetta TDI that I use about once a week or less for heavier grocery trips that won’t fit in my bikes basket, or other larger purchases.

Lucy Vinis

I live at the top of Chambers where the closest bus service is mid-way down the hill. This means that I drive a car in order to conduct most of my work and personal errands. That said, we moved to this neighborhood so that our children could walk to the neighborhood school and easily visit their friends on foot and bike. I have never been confident about riding a bike up and down Chambers and cannot juggle the demands of my schedule without the efficiency of a car. This is regrettable, but I don’t see my hill as a transit priority for the city.

Question 5

Eugene’s 2012 pavement bond measure allocates about $8 million a year for five years to resurface and repair city streets. Of that $516,000 annually (about 6 percent) is allocated to support bicycle and pedestrian projects. Will you support a renewal of this bond measure when it expires? Do you think there should be any change in the allocation to bicycle/pedestrian focused projects?

BOB CASSIDY

[did not address this particular question directly]

MIKE CLARK

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

Am not sure what to think about this. Bond measures for many city supported activities could be cropping up soon. Better sidewalks and more bike access on streets where motor vehicles are not overwhelming.

Stefan Strek

I like bonds. We’re a huge fan of bonds at the Strek Campaign. Many of the city’s streets need to be resurfaced and repaved. Many of the city’s bike lanes need to be updated and re-routed. I think the allocation to bicycle/pedestrian projects needs to have more input from local citizens, many of the bicycle/pedestrian projects I see the city set up are wasteful, or even dangerous. One example is the corner of 13th & Willamette where the bike lane crosses through traffic lanes, it’s completely a death-risk to any biker — and an insurance liability for any driver. That’s one of the most trafficked streets in Eugene and should have been planned more responsibly. Coincidentally, there is a white bicycle on that corner as a memorial to Eugene’s bike traffic accident victims. Whoever was in charge of that should have had more consideration, and I’d prioritize bicycle route safety.

Lucy Vinis

I would support the renewal of the bond measure. As for the percentage dedicated to bicycle and pedestrian projects, I would love to see more funds dedicated to sidewalks which are key to many neighborhoods and their discontinuity forces people to step out into the roads. I would also like to see more investment in traffic calming and crossings. Those may be higher priorities for me than more bicycle lanes.

Question 6

In November 2015, the council passed a Vision Zero resolution, saying the city should strive to reduce the number of fatalities and serious injuries on Eugene streets to zero. If you had been on the council at the time, would you have supported this resolution? If you were on the council then, tell us about your vote and your thinking on the resolution. How do you see the city accomplishing this goal? What role would you play?

Bob Cassidy

Vision Zero is a “no brainer”. Would we want a vision of maybe 5, and be satisfied if we only had 4? Obviously the goal should be zero, as is the goal of EWEB for accidents. And they spend enough money to make that happen.

MIKE CLARK

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

Tsunami Books [Landfield’s business] has played a major role in creating a real vision zero between 24th and 29th on Willamette. There has not been a single traffic death of any sort on this stretch in at least the past 18 years, despite 15,000+ vehicles per day on a narrow street. We have helped the street work well with what it is, and will continue doing so using many creative methods of positive engagement and action.

Stefan Strek

The Vision Zero resolution a good resolution. We shouldn’t have people dying in Eugene while they’re simply trying to go out for a bike ride. If I’d been on the council at the time I’d have supported that resolution and would have promoted more responsible planning of bike routes. As I’ve explained, routing bike routes across traffic lanes is an extreme health hazard, it’s death-risk to any Eugene bike commuter and needs to be addressed. Bike routes should be to the side of the road, wide enough to provide a safe buffer zone between bicycles and traffic. It’s a very simple concept to avoid the collision between cars and bicycles that needs to be implemented, whoever decided to route bike routes across traffic lanes needs to lose their job, and I’m giving them a bad job reference on the way out. I’d tell them, “You’re fired!” and hire someone who actually cares about Eugene’s people.

Lucy Vinis

I absolutely support Vision Zero and would have voted for it had I been on the council. As I wrote above, I would like to see us improve our sidewalks, street crossings and traffic calming in order to make it safer for people to walk. I would like to improve the transparency, accountability and process for prioritizing these repairs.

Question 7

Would you like to list any specific accomplishments in which you helped improve conditions for people who ride bikes, walk or take transit to get around town?

BOB CASSIDY

[did not address this particular question directly]

MIKE CLARK

[awaiting response]

Scott Landfield

Two years ago I personally took the lead in fixing a very serious bicycle access design flaw built at 24th and Amazon Parkway, this after I suffered a near-death injury on the city’s new, flawed access.

Stefan Strek

I regularly use transit and practice good etiquette. I give up my seat for the elderly, women with children, or disabled people every time. Think globally, act locally.

Lucy Vinis

I represented the interests of environmental organizations for 17 years as the Eugene campaign manager for EarthShare Oregon. Our members included Bicycle Transportation Alliance, 1000 Friends of Oregon and others who were focused on land use and livability. My role was to engage employers and employees in private and public workplaces to understand and support the work of the EarthShare member organizations. In my time with EarthShare, the Eugene campaign grew from two participating workplaces to 20, and included some of the highest dollar support for environmental work in our statewide annual campaign.

Question 8

Anything else you want to add on this general topic?

Scott Landfield

Soon after I first arrived in Eugene, I was told it was the #1 town for biking in America. It certainly is not now. I will work toward it being the very best it can be in the near-term and long term.

Stefan Strek

Eugene’s a great city to live in largely because of Eugene’s connections, between people, and these exist because of active transportation routes which are used by people who think positively about Eugene culture. Many cities do not have access to parks and public space as Eugene does. We’re at a crossroads between using incoming resources responsibly to reinforce Eugene’s progressive, free-thinking, independent, local-business loving culture — or we can let out of town influence continue to dominate Eugene politics and Eugene policy. I am the only candidate who has mentioned helping animals in addition to people, and I have always cared about the environment as something that’s alive the same as any animal. Together, we can do more than “Make Eugene Great Again.” I think we have access to, “A Better Eugene.” We can have a clean town that’s fun to live in.

Currently, the major detraction for Eugene’s culture is the prevalence of bike-theft and property crime. The “Kryptonite” lock company produces fine locks internationally, and their locks are uninsured for theft everywhere except two cities: New York City and Eugene, Oregon. True story, almost everyone who bikes in Eugene has had their bike stolen. Many residents have had several bikes worth over a thousand dollars stolen or stripped for parts without any investigation from the police, because it’s such an extreme problem that’s been ignored by local authorities and de-prioritized by the current administration.

Our police officers are hard-working people who need more help reorganizing administrative priorities so that local officers on the ground are able to respond and protect local citizens from crime. My plan to eliminate bike theft in Eugene is to introduce mandatory minimum community service sentences for all bike-related theft and strictly enforce them, to provide much needed maintenance for Eugene’s roads and parkland. Through community service, these people who otherwise would victimize the community will learn self-discipline, self-respect, and earn the sense of accomplishment that comes with helping the community — and the rest of us will lose less parts off our bikes, the parks will be cleaner, and the roads will be better maintained so we’ll all be able to live in a more positive Eugene.

Job Opportunity: Skilled and Upbeat Bike Mechanic

Arriving By Bike™ is accepting applications for an enthusiastic professional mechanic. Our mission is to support and serve people who use bikes for transportation in their daily lives.

Mechanics assess bikes, discuss needs and options, and service and build bikes. Also work cohesively with staff to make our shop hum: provide superior customer service, find solutions and gear to fill cyclists’ needs, stock merchandise, and maintain a clean and organized store.

Ideal candidate: uses a bicycle for daily transportation, has touring experience, excellent with beginners, families, and experienced cyclists, and has prior training or employment in bicycle industry. Desired skills also include working on the latest transportation equipment: city, touring, and cargo bikes, dynamo lighting, electric assist, and accessory installation.

25 – 40 hours, can include weekends. Contact employment@arrivingbybike.com or stop by the shop at 2705 Willamette Street to pick-up an application.

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LiveMove Speaker Series: Building Advocacy Movements with Lori Kessler Gratl

Join the LiveMove Speaker Series for another interesting speaker this Friday, April 29th 7:30-9:00pm at Bicycle Way of Life (556 Charnelton St.). Free event sponsored by LiveMove, OTREC, SCI, and Bicycle Way of Life. Free food courtesy of the Tap and Growler.

Lori Kessler Gratl is an architect, enthusiastic cyclist and member of the board of directors of Vancouver, BC, based advocacy group HUB. She bikes to work daily, loves long-distance touring, and is a performing member of the B:C:Clettes. Lori will speak about how to build and sustain an advocacy movement and demonstrate some of the successes of HUB’s bicycle advocacy in Vancouver, BC.

Join the Facebook event and spread the word.

LiveMove April2016 Speaker

Job Postings- Bike Friday, City of Eugene, Trips for Kids

Job Postings for Bike Friday

  • Customer Service bike mechanic and parts puller (Full Time)
  • Purchasing agent (Full Time)
  • Reception and showroom greater for the summer (Part time for the season)

For details about these positions see the Bike Friday job posting website.

Bike Friday Eugene, Oregon on Wednesday, March 26, 2014.  Meg Roussos/Bloomberg

Bike Friday Eugene, Oregon on Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Meg Roussos/Bloomberg

City of Eugene Park Ambassador Position Open

Would you or someone you know be interested in working along Eugene’s riverfront park system primarily by bike this summer to enrich the experience of park patrons? The City of Eugene Parks and Open Space Division has two openings in their park ambassador program. The program runs from mid-May through mid-September. Apply by May 2.  Good people skills a must.
Craigslist ad with more information here

Park.Ambassadors

Youth Mountain Bike Group Leader
Trips for Kids-CAT (TFK-CAT) is seeking a new leader for our youth outdoor organization.
Roles & responsibilities include leading youth mountain bike trips (can include camping), administration, volunteer coordination, public relations/marketing, etc.
Eligible candidates will have good organization skills, bicycle riding skills, and communication skills. An appreciation for the outdoors and a firm belief that youth need to spend more time enjoying the natural world that surrounds us are a must.
TFK-CAT’s current leader will continue to support the organization including being available to train the new leader. This is a volunteer position. Send cover-letter & resume to trips4kids (at) catoregon (dot) org.